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LiFePo4 puncture test

ClassicBiker

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
HighTechLab: "I'm going to stab it and...run!"
HighTechLab: "Oh look it's glowing red inside, but no flames."
HightTechLab: "Should I stab it again? What do you think, Garret?"
Garret: "Sure."
HighTechLab: "Oh look it's on fire."
Me: "Now you've pissed it off!"

Seriously, though my take away is this. The LiFePO4 is probably fine unless there is a double puncture. With a single puncture it is a possible ignition source, with a double puncture it is definitely an ignition source. A well protected and secured battery is not likely to be punctured in an accident, if it is the accident is extremely serious and the battery is the least of your worries.

What I found telling was the video that followed. It really abused some batteries and showed the results.

 

Monkeypants

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
A puncture is pretty extreme,but it's good to be aware of the potential.
It seems there are other things that can make LiFePo4 batteries angry as well.
Screenshot_20220322-093104.png
Screenshot_20220321-095547.png
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
I tried to tell the Forum about this sort of thing a long time ago,
And was thought wrong,
My advice with an Electric Car , Is to have one or 2 !, Of those safety hammers,
For breaking the windows,
And in a crash , If the doors will not open because of safety locks ?,
Break the windows and get the hell out of there !.
 

ClassicBiker

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
LiPo batteries are what are used in electric model aircraft. I have a couple of small quads that I mess about with. When I got into the larger models I purchased a LiPo for it and the appropriate charger. The safety warnings that accompanied it about how to charge, when to charge, where to charge, what to have on hand when charging, all because of their tendency to got POOF! Use a programable balanced charger, place the battery in a fire proof envelope, inside a metal box, outside and maintain visual contact with it at all times, how you do that when it is inside of two containers I don't know. If it starts to swell, if it starts to get hot, if it starts to emit vapors, unplug it from the charger, let it cool, do not continue charging, dispose of it properly in accordance with local laws and regulations. Which no one seems to know what they are. If it catches fire, if it explodes, do not pour water on it, rather smother it with sand or use a non-water fire extinguisher.
Then GM issues notices not to charge your Chevrolet Bolt inside your garage or near your house because of a potential fire risk when charging. Then GM issues another safety notice not to park your Chevrolet Bolt near other vehicles in park lots because of a potential fire risks that may damage other vehicles that may occur if the battery gets to hot.
Put me right off messing about with anything with a LiPo battery in it.
Steven
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
And this is Progress !,
Bit like the Petrol,
The Fumes look Horrific , What ever happened to health and Safety,
Is it his day off ?.
 

Monkeypants

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Lithium batteries have been the #1 cause of house fire deaths in Vancouver this year. Many houses have an ebike or two stored somewhere. The fires have been caused by Lithium batteries of various chemistries including LiFePo4.
I have 40 volt lithium batteries for gardening equipment. They are going to find a new home in the pump house, well away from the house and the other. outbuildings.

 
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Monkeypants

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Good question. Are your tools using Lithium batteries or older type Ni-cad? We have a number of older battery tools in the shop, all Ni-cad. Newer tools tend to be lithium type.
I've never read of a Ni-cad battery causing a fire.
 

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