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Intake Manifold

DangerDan

Forum Website User
VOC Member
Back in a day during; my 2 stroken dirt riding days, we ported and polished the intakes and heads. There was a caution that too smooth was counter productive. Now I looking inside these brass lined intake manifolds, they are like glass. Is this standard or the results of an over zealous previous owner? I'm thinking of lightly hitting them with glass beading. Unless someone has a better idea.
 

chankly bore

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
If you are using your machine to the limit of its performance and at the upper end of its rev. range it may get you to the next corner a tread depth sooner than the next bloke, otherwise I don't think it matters a pig's burp either way. I suppose "roughing " the surface may increase droplet adhesion but whether this is a good or bad thing the likes of Mr. Southwell may be more qualified to answer that this humble bodger.
 

Kansas Bad Man

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
The length, shape, and size of the manifold which is the primary contributor, to the volumetric efficiency of a given engine referred to as the cake of the port, the finish is referred to as the frosting on the cake. The cake allows for the air to go from a pressure side to a variable absent of pleasure side , the air having velocity accordingly and is a value which allows carburation. After carburation accrues the next thing to enhance the fuel air charge is the animation of the fuel particles by increasing the turbulence of the air charge . A textured surface by bead blasting is a common practice to increase turbulance, how much it raises the H.P. depends on the builder, the younger ones seem to believe in texturing while the older guys like the polish mop. The modern engines do seem to have a little more mussel then the older ones so it boils down to a preference. Do I go with the frosting or not?

Max
 

DangerDan

Forum Website User
VOC Member
Chankly I just painted my cylinders and heads on this BS. I'm stripping the carbon off the pistons. Not my idea of fun. 40 years ago I stop trying to beat the next guy to my next crash site. Today I' m about eviciency. I understand the limitation of the technology. I will be content with knowing I've done what I can. If I need to jet the carbs diffrently, fine. If I need to plug the cylinders differently , fine. If I need to use a vacuum gauge to balance the carbs, fine. I'll do these things initially just so I know I tried. Will it reduce the carbon build up. No. I'm good with that.
Max thanks for your imput. You ended with a question. Would you?

Glen
 
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