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How to get a motorcycle license…

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Well on top of that they made the requirement for the off road test areas so they hard to find and so are far apart and they managed to split our lobby groups into two factions (Mag & BMF) neat work by excessive anti motorcycle .gov
The whole system is set to prevent new motorcyclist to join. meanwhile the standards for driving a car is abysmal
All part of the nudge nudge .gov way of imposing its demands.
 

Albervin

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
As a motorcycle trainer/tester for the last ten years I have been very interested in the different tests applied to motorcyclists around the world. In some countries it is as easy as ABC while in others it is most definitely not. The cost of obtaining a full, unrestricted licence also varies from a few hundred dollars (or less) to several thousands. Some of the stand-outs are: In Singapore you have to ride a motorcycle on a plank of wood that is 20m long. There is a minimum time limit BUT you are allowed to stop as long as you keep your feet on the footpegs. In France you have to complete a slalom course, do a U-turn and then return along the slalom course, there is a maximum time limit and you have a pillion passenger! In Norway you have to do a three hour road ride with the instructor seated behind you. I have been told the French and Norwegian tests can cost up to $4,000!.
We have a graduated system in NSW but every state has a different system. In Queenland the basic NSW Pre-learner course is deemed an advanced rider course. In Victoria they have a bizarre system where unlicenced riders are taken out onto the roads with an instructor.
Meanwhile the car driving test can be sat by people with four brain cells.
 

bmetcalf

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
This is the skills test here in Virginia: https://www.dmv.virginia.gov/webdoc/pdf/dmv34.pdf

Hard to tell if you get out of first gear! No assessment if you can handle the motorway at all! A 19 year old can roll away from the test on a 221 hp Ducati Panigale or even a good Rapide :eek: with this test and a written test under his belt, cost US$32.
 

ClassicBiker

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Michigan isn't much different. 40 years ago it was totally abysmal though. At 16 years old right after I had completed my driver's ed through my high school and the mandatory 30 day learner permit I went for my license exam for my car license. I took the written test and road exam and passed and told the examiner I wanted my motorcycle license. My father and I had trailered a Yamaha 125 to the exam so in the parking lot I did a couple of circles clockwise and counter clockwise, an "emergency stop", and showed the examiner I knew where the brakes, turn signals, and horn where. That was it, the examiner didn't even know how to ride a motorcycle. Now driver's ed is only done privately, not through the schools. Rider's training is done through the community college in the spring semester only, if they offer it at all. That or again you have to find it privately. So at least there is some training. But there needs to be an acceptable medium between total apathy and total obstruction.
 

bmetcalf

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
In 1971, I took the skills test in Chicago on a parking lot course. I was almost 23 on my first bike, a BSA 650 Lightning. I was wearing my Dad's old Army field jacket and maybe the examiner thought I was a veteran and looked mature. Anyway, he didn't even watch me go through the course. I've survived these 50 years of riding, so it seemed to have worked.
 

Roslyn

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
As a motorcycle trainer/tester for the last ten years I have been very interested in the different tests applied to motorcyclists around the world. In some countries it is as easy as ABC while in others it is most definitely not. The cost of obtaining a full, unrestricted licence also varies from a few hundred dollars (or less) to several thousands. Some of the stand-outs are: In Singapore you have to ride a motorcycle on a plank of wood that is 20m long. There is a minimum time limit BUT you are allowed to stop as long as you keep your feet on the footpegs. In France you have to complete a slalom course, do a U-turn and then return along the slalom course, there is a maximum time limit and you have a pillion passenger! In Norway you have to do a three hour road ride with the instructor seated behind you. I have been told the French and Norwegian tests can cost up to $4,000!.
We have a graduated system in NSW but every state has a different system. In Queenland the basic NSW Pre-learner course is deemed an advanced rider course. In Victoria they have a bizarre system where unlicenced riders are taken out onto the roads with an instructor.
Meanwhile the car driving test can be sat by people with four brain cells.
four brain cells they would be in mensa you mean one?
 

Robert Watson

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I got my license at 16 and it covered cars and motorcycles with no extra testing. I started on an 80 cc Yamaha but switched to 4 wheels pretty quickly. By the time I was 20 I thought of myself as a pretty good driver. Then I took up racing a car on a short paved oval track. I did that for a couple of years and then knew I was a better driver!
In the late 80's I bought a motorcycle, 550 cc of UJM, and rode it for couple of years. I now needed to do a simple parking lot road test as they had introduced a separate procedure at some point of my non motorcycle owing days. I passed it easily and thought a was a pretty good rider. Then I took up Vintage racing at the local road circuit (Westwood), 1.9 miles of a bit tricky up and down and twisty pavement. It was run by the local sports car club and the Motorcycle club rented it every Wednesday afternoon/evening in the summer, so that's where I would be with the BSA 750 triple. After a few years of that and racing there, and at a track in Seattle and another in Portland, I new I was a pretty good rider.

From those two experiences I have told anyone who would listen (not many!) to go and do some track days, it won't be cheap but it will be cheaper that what value you put on your life!

I knew a guy once whose card listed his qualifications. I questioned the first one he listed

CS&E

Common Sense and Experience
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
There is a simpler way to get better as a rider (and I say that after many years of road racing) and thats trials and trail riding. Spend a few weeks with the back wheel stepping out, the front wheel loosing bite and balancing at zero MPH and you will really know where its at.
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I could not pass my Bike test, Till I passed my car test,
One time On Braking, The bloke walked out in front of me ,
Coming down a hill, Wet and Muddy !, I had it sideways like a speedway rider,
I thought I had done well !,
Didn't fall off !, But he failed me !!,
So I bought a Vincent Twin with a Sidecar, And L plates :D .
 

timetraveller

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Same kind of story here. I had been riding my Vin twin on L plates for years and they were about to bring in a rule that learners were limited to a small capacity bike. I booked the test but was doing a job of some sort on my own bike on the day of the test and so borrowed a twin belonging to local member, Paul Champion, who still speaks to me. After all the usual stuff the examiner asked me to ride round a series of streets which formed a loop and told me that at some stage he would step out from the pavement and get me to do an emergency stop. I went round the loop about four or five times with the examiner starting to step of the pavement as I want passed and then stepping back. On the next circuit he stepped right out into the road at the last minute and it really was an emergency stop. The road was freshly gravelled and about an inch thick in loose chippings. I and the bike went down and as I stood up I started to tell him exactly what I thought of him and set off towards him with what must have been a gleam in my eye. He retreated rapidly, waving his arms about and shouting "its all right you passed, you passed". Paul's bike had a slight mark on the exhaust pipe, but as I said, he still speaks to me, generally in quite friendly terms.
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
On the 4th try !! , The bloke said don't slow off before I jump out,
I thought you must be having a laugh, I didn't go over 20 mph,
And it stopped dead, No fuss. =Pass.
Hope I don't have to take one again.
 

b'knighted

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
One story I heard involved the candidate riding round the block several times then coming around a corner in time to see the examiner being wiped out by a surprised qualified rider who just happened to be on that road.
 

stu spalding

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The examiner gave me directions to follow, saying he'd step out for the emergency stop. I got lost on a housing estate. On another occasion with a different rider the examiner stepped out and got flattened. He'd picked the wrong bike! Cheers, Stu.
 

Chris Launders

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
It was a snowy Feburary when I took mine and the roads were really wet and slushy, I slid off twice, out of the examiners sight fortunately. When I did the emergency stop he said "you were going a bit too slow coming along there" to which I replied " that's as fast as I think the conditions safely allow" and got an extra tick for that, and a pass.
 

Nulli Secundus

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
I passed my test first time in snowy and sleety conditions in February 1976 on my brother's D1 125 Bantam. I had a lady examiner and she explained that she would hold out her clipboard when she wanted me to do the emergency stop. Well on the very first lap I was approaching her and was beginning to assume that she wasn't going to do it as there was probably traffic behind, but just as I was level with her I saw the board go out in the corner of my eye. It took me by so much surprise that I literally did everything in unison. I hit both brakes hard, closed the throttle and de-clutched. The Bantam stood on its nose and whilst the back wheel snaked, I kept it in a straight line (No Barry Briggs style for me like Bill did).

It was an impressive stop regarding distance traveled and she said "Well I won't ask you to do that again".

I assumed I had failed and the riding test was completed. When it came to the questions she asked me what order do you operate the controls in an emergency stop? I think if I had got that wrong it would of cemented the failure, but because I knew the answer I think she let me off.
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I passed my test first time in snowy and sleety conditions in February 1976 on my brother's D1 125 Bantam. I had a lady examiner and she explained that she would hold out her clipboard when she wanted me to do the emergency stop. Well on the very first lap I was approaching her and was beginning to assume that she wasn't going to do it as there was probably traffic behind, but just as I was level with her I saw the board go out in the corner of my eye. It took me by so much surprise that I literally did everything in unison. I hit both brakes hard, closed the throttle and de-clutched. The Bantam stood on its nose and whilst the back wheel snaked, I kept it in a straight line (No Barry Briggs style for me like Bill did).

It was an impressive stop regarding distance traveled and she said "Well I won't ask you to do that again".

I assumed I had failed and the riding test was completed. When it came to the questions she asked me what order do you operate the controls in an emergency stop? I think if I had got that wrong it would of cemented the failure, but because I knew the answer I think she let me off.
0h to be young again,
Mind you I still make a Pratt of myself.
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
My Weapon of choice was Ariel Leader, Now you know it had to be a Racer :D ,
I took the screen off !,
Fine little Bike, If it had another carb' and another gear in the Box, It would have been a World Beater,
If it's good enough for George Brown, It's good enough for me .
 

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