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F: Frame Heim joints

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Im like a kid with a new toy now I know another name for ball joints :) To avoid spoiling the front brake thread here is my use of them on my sub frame at present on my Comet. NB its got a large seat on at the moment
1595678572742.png
 

Robert Watson

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
If I recall they are called Heim joints because that was the name of the man or company that invented them. Much like a vacuum cleaner (especially in the UK) is called a Hoover. So I just looked at Wikipedia.

The spherical rod end bearing was developed by Nazi Germany during World War II.[1] When one of the first German planes to be shot down by the British in early 1940 was examined, they found this joint in use in the aircraft's control systems. Following this discovery, the Allied governments gave the H.G. Heim Company an exclusive patent to manufacture these joints in North America, while in the UK the patent passed to Rose Bearings Ltd.[2] The ubiquity of these manufacturers in their respective markets led to the terms heim joint and rose joint becoming synonymous with their product. After the patents ran out the common names stuck, although as of 2017 "rosejoint" remains a registered trademark of Minebea Mitsumi Inc.,[3] successor to Rose Bearings Ltd. Originally used in aircraft, the rod end bearing may be found in cars, trucks, race cars,[4] motorcycles,[5] lawn tractors, boats, industrial machines, go-karts, radio-control helicopters, formula cars,[6] and many more applications.
 

Nulli Secundus

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
If I recall they are called Heim joints because that was the name of the man or company that invented them. Much like a vacuum cleaner (especially in the UK) is called a Hoover.
My father always corrected my mother for saying she was doing the hoovering when she had an Electrolux. So it was vacuuming cleaning in his house as it has always been in my UK house too, whatever the term is referring to.......

Back onto Heim joints before I have to tell myself off.
 

Chris Launders

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Is there any particular reason for the diagonal strut that you've fitted them to, I only converted mine last week and just have the two from the back of the seat down.
 

MartynG

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VOC Member
Is there any particular reason for the diagonal strut that you've fitted them to, I only converted mine last week and just have the two from the back of the seat down.
With the Vincent seat (other than Flash or lightning) with a simple single strut suspended seat, when you place a load on the seat there is an induced turning moment applied to those 2 small legs at the seat front. Hit a big enough bump or even a small one sufficient times and the photo shows what eventually happens. Fit the strut you ask about and the stress is removed from those vulnerable legs.

P1060038aaa.jpg
 

Vincent Brake

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
My father always corrected my mother for saying she was doing the hoovering when she had an Electrolux. So it was vacuuming cleaning in his house as it has always been in my UK house too, whatever the term is referring to.......

Back onto Heim joints before I have to tell myself off.
That doesn't translate well back to where you came from....
 

stu spalding

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Is there any particular reason for the diagonal strut that you've fitted them to, I only converted mine last week and just have the two from the back of the seat down.
Hi Chris. I just use the single struts which also double as the base for a luggage rack. I reinforced the seat front mounting to avoid Martyn's problems in the photo above. I also extend the angle iron brace on the top of seat base to include the front mounting and seat brackets. Cheers, Stu.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I wanted to keep the seat bases standard the big seat is often swapped out for standard also I may revert to original struts on one bike
The twin racer and the flash have single supports the comet racet has had many single supports square round steel alloy there is not too much stress on a solo race track but for the road comet two up with throw over bags I wanted strength hence the extra support and it's no trouble to add a strut especially with a coilover
 

Chris Launders

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Thanks a lot, as I say I only fitted mine a week ago as an experiment, it does make a huge difference to comfort, my seat is a home made long version and the frame is thicker than standard in stainless but I will definitely keep an eye on it, I shall probably make a better version as well, I like the bottom fittings on MartynGs
 

Marcus Bowden

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Front seat bracket repaired in NZ 1995 at Taupo after a few miles of unsealed roads (Genital Annie), rings a bell, now sealed the whole route.
Triangulated s/s bracket, screwed to the aluminium seat base.

IMG_2448.jpeg

Support lugs moved outboard in line with footrest plates but retained friction damper and made narrower knob for R.H.S.

IMG_2449.jpeg

Picnic table paniers that slide on from the rear and fitted by four R pins, carrying extra lights and turn signals, total capacity is 92 LTRs 26 inches wide so will fit through any doorway. in use for 29 years now.

IMG_2450.jpeg
 

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