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H: Hubs, Wheels and Tyres Front wheel shims and bearings

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danno

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Alloy brake plates aside for a mo :D I’m getting a bit closer to finding out the thickness of the shims.
I’ve never used a micrometer before but there’s a useful article on Wikihow on how to read them (thimble and sleeve type).
The Moore & Wright one here has been looked after so that’ll do fine.

The dials are just packed in with the micrometer but don’t know what they’re
supposed to be used with.
One threads into something.
 

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vibrac

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I thought with post #5 I had covered how I do it so re-reading it and hand on heart I have never thought of measuring any shims I cant quite see where that comes in. As I start to take shims out to reduce the clearance I just feel them with my fingers and grab a thinner one or leave it out, In the end I feel that minute clearance and the game stops.
 

Bill Thomas

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Sorry Danno, We are a Shower, We always drift off and get told off :) ,
Easy way to check the Micrometer is to put a feeler gauge between the gap, You must have feeler gauges for Plug gaps ?, And read off where you are, In thousands of an inch !!!.
The other things are handy, If you have a lathe or some other jobs, The middle one needs some sort of stand,
Not sure if you can buy them without the dial, But I have one that works off a magnet, Just switch the magnet on and off and it will stick to any steel part.
The left one looks to be for a special job ??, That it screws into ??.
 

timetraveller

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I would guess that the left one is for getting TDC by screwing it into the plug hole. You can find out whether the thread is the same as a spark plug. The middle one is, as Bill says, it is fastened to a rod which itself can be fastened into various types of device to hold it on to the work to be measured.. The left one is a standard micrometer and probably has a circular piece in the box which is a regulation one inch diameter to allow the adjustment of the zero point of the micrometer.
 

Albervin

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It is always handy to isolate your shims into separate drawers, tins etc. The only way to do this properly is to use the micrometer, especially when they are unknown off a bike. A good way to spend some isolation time. Ideally you use the least amount of shims for each application so it would be good to know whether you have a 25 thou to replace two 10 thou and a five thou. You could colour code them with coloured texta pens if you want.
 

Bill Thomas

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These things are very handy, Don't get rid of them, You won't use them for years,
Then one day !, Just the job !.
I have a 1 inch, 2 inch and a 4 inch, Just found a longer pin that screws into the 2 inch to make it a 1 inch,
All clever stuff.
If you use the dial thingy for TDC, Don't forget the Piston stays at TDC for few degrees,
The way to do it is to take a reading, Say an inch either side of TDC and with a degree wheel find the middle.
You don't tell us how old you are ?, Sorry if I am over doing it.
To hold the Mic' Put your little finger through the hole with the pin sticking upwards so you can turn the pin
with your thumb and first finger.
 

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vibrac

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It is always handy to isolate your shims into separate drawers, tins etc. The only way to do this properly is to use the micrometer, especially when they are unknown off a bike. A good way to spend some isolation time. Ideally you use the least amount of shims for each application so it would be good to know whether you have a 25 thou to replace two 10 thou and a five thou. You could colour code them with coloured texta pens if you want.
Ok here is a compromise (which I guess I must have done way back in the many times I have done the job) Measure the damm things and hold them in your fingers and I think you will find you can soon differentiate between the thicknesses by how they distort and feel ( Kinesthetic sence). After all you dont care what they measure just if they are thicker or thinner than the one you take out and if their addition or removal gets you to that magic clearance feel. As I say I have never measured a wheel shim in my life just bought an assorted pack.
 

danno

Well Known and Active Website User
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Ok here is a compromise (which I guess I must have done way back in the many times I have done the job) Measure the damm things and hold them in your fingers and I think you will find you can soon differentiate between the thicknesses by how they distort and feel ( Kinesthetic sence). After all you dont care what they measure just if they are thicker or thinner than the one you take out and if their addition or removal gets you to that magic clearance feel. As I say I have never measured a wheel shim in my life just bought an assorted pack.
Yes agree. I can tell if the shims are the same thickness really by feel or flexing them.
Maybe being over fussy. As long as there’s similar amount or thickness either
side for keeping wheel central.
I’ll bung it all back, make sure there’s a small amount of play and then check with fingers for centralised wheel position, as Bill mentions.
 

danno

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I would guess that the left one is for getting TDC by screwing it into the plug hole. You can find out whether the thread is the same as a spark plug. The middle one is, as Bill says, it is fastened to a rod which itself can be fastened into various types of device to hold it on to the work to be measured.. The left one is a standard micrometer and probably has a circular piece in the box which is a regulation one inch diameter to allow the adjustment of the zero point of the micrometer.
Yes, thought the thread looked the same as a spark plug.
 

Bill Thomas

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On the spark plug thingy ?, There is a screw on the side of the tube, Maybe if loose you can alter the depth ??.
 

danno

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
These things are very handy, Don't get rid of them, You won't use them for years,
Then one day !, Just the job !.
I have a 1 inch, 2 inch and a 4 inch, Just found a longer pin that screws into the 2 inch to make it a 1 inch,
All clever stuff.
If you use the dial thingy for TDC, Don't forget the Piston stays at TDC for few degrees,
The way to do it is to take a reading, Say an inch either side of TDC and with a degree wheel find the middle.
You don't tell us how old you are ?, Sorry if I am over doing it.
To hold the Mic' Put your little finger through the hole with the pin sticking upwards so you can turn the pin
with your thumb and first finger.
Thanks for the advice. Got a fair few obscure tools knocking around and enough, short of a metal turning lathe, to keep the Vin on the road. Lacking a pillar drill too
but someone advised that a hobby mill machine would be a better bet.
52.
 

stu spalding

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Thanks for the advice. Got a fair few obscure tools knocking around and enough, short of a metal turning lathe, to keep the Vin on the road. Lacking a pillar drill too
but someone advised that a hobby mill machine would be a better bet.
If you do take the plunge, Danno, the combined Lathe/ Mill from Machine Mart is a useful piece of kit for the beginner. Cheers, Stu.
 

Bill Thomas

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I love tools, All sorts, I do a bit of Wood Work too, The Wife used to bring home from Her Boot Fairs,
All sorts of C--p, But I always use them at some time, Sometimes chop them up to make other special tools.
I only now have a Wood Lathe, But have altered it to do a bit of metal work,
A mig welder for me is the best bit of kit.
 

danno

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VOC Member
If you do take the plunge, Danno, the combined Lathe/ Mill from Machine Mart is a useful piece of kit for the beginner. Cheers, Stu.
Nice! Just checked it out.
Used to have a large home engineered wood turning lathe, and a really old pillar drill. Had a wall mounted electric motor.
Did everything on that and had plenty of room for wide stuff plus a heavy vice and
adjustable table.
Had to sell all the big machines sadly due to house move.
Now need to get something compact and versatile to cover most jobs.
Single garage, 3 bikes and tools all over the floor currently.
 

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Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
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You have more than a lot of blokes,
These boot fairs are worth going to, I find it strange how cheap tools sell for,
I guess House Clearance after a Chap has Passed,
I don't go, Just drop the Wife off and pick Her up later, I would buy everything :) .
 

danno

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I guess House Clearance after a Chap has Passed,
One place I looked at while house hunting was just that.
All garage contents included in the sale.
Long double rammed full of stuff including a canoe and a step thru scooter bike.
At the back was a small workshop with a huge metal turning lathe and shelves of
baccy tins just like I have.
Quick decision needed so had to pass up on that one.
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Sounds like just the job !.
The Wife keeps talking Divorce, Silly Cow, We are both 73, But if we did I think most of my stuff would be in the House :D , Like back in the 80s in London, Brother Ron, Membership sec', Said the other day,
What a Sod I was !,
As soon as I moved in I sawed off the banisters on the stairs,
So that I could get my Special round the corner and into the front room !,
I had a metal lathe in there and lots of spares, And a Comet Engine/Gearbox on a coffee table,
I had a sofa and chairs etc, And kept it cleanish,
After the Wife moved in, People often went in there for a cup of tea etc,
She was the only one who didn't like it.
Even Her Daughter and first Grandson were often in there !.
 

Albervin

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VOC Member
Unless you live outside a city, in Australia the blocks of land are getting smaller and the houses are getting bigger. This leaves little room for a proper shed. When I was house hunting in 2001 I had my priorities: low maintenance, decent garage and a shed. Amazingly my wife had different priorities: large kitchen, separate dining and living areas plus room for a library. The first house we inspected ticked all boxes and house hunting was done in a week. Sometimes you get lucky but now the shed is too small.;);)
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Dont get a lot of space
:confused:
Contrary to common belief the number of bikes you own does not depend on money it depends on how long you have been riding and how much space you have.
I have heard people say 'you cant have too many bikes' they obviously have never spoken to the painter of the Forth bridge.
 
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