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D model rear shock

Deroberson

Active Website User
VOC Member
Does anyone have any tips for the disassembly of a rear shock for a D. I would like to refurbish the shock, I do not see the rubber grommets listed in the spares list or any article related in Forty/Ten years on or any other literature that I have.

Was it meant to be replaced and not refurbed?

Thanks
Dave
 
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Paul Adams

Website User
VOC Member
Series D shocks

Hi Dave.
You will need to construct a compression tool which is long enough to fit the whole of the damper into.
At the top you will need to turn up a stout ring which will compress the outer part of the damper cover which allows you to remove the alloy C section locating ring. This get the spring off the unit but ,I don't think the damper itself is servicable but I've heard of new replacements being available at quite a cost.
Hope this is of some used to you.
Paul Adams
 

deejay499

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
If anyone locally wants a `D`spring compressor, I have one that they can borrow. To help mine with a sidecar, I used a sidecar spring with a 1/2" spacer under the spring to pre load it. A lot of solos prefer the sidecar spring as well.
Cheers, DJ
 

Deroberson

Active Website User
VOC Member
Rubber Grommets?

Thanks Paul, I see that the whole unit will have to be compressed, and from the outer edges of the damper sleeve to get the C collar off.

Any ideas on the rubber grommets? I see a steel sleeve with a washer on each side, the washers on both sides look like the may be tack welded or brazed in place, is this true? How can I refurb the rubber grommets on each end?

Thanks
Dave
 

macvette

Well Known and Active Website User
Non-VOC Member
D shock

Hi Dave,
I have a D and renewed the bushes. I didn't do anything to the shock itself because there were no leaks, the rod was in great condition and there was plenty of damping. There is a compression tool to remove the spring collets. It consists of a stout ring with a slot to allow it to slip onto the top of the spring housing. An inverted U shape is welded to the ring with a hole in the centre of the U. A clevis is attached to the top eye of the shock through the hole in the U and a nut is used to compress the spring to allow the collets to be removed. I didn't have one so I improvised with a very stout screwdriver. I wouldn't recomend it!
As far as bushes go, I Googled "polyeurethane shock bushes" and found a number or suppliers with online catalogues showing the dimensions of their bushes.These are usually for car suspensions. I found bushes with the correct taper and inner and outer diameters, the only thing I had to do was trim them slightly to length. You need two single taper bushes for each shock eye. You could start by looking at Powerflex. You will need and inner sleeve and two washers at each eye. It's important to get inch size bushes and sleeves but that shouldn't be a problem in the states.
If none of this appeals, you could splash ot on a Thornton system. Forgot to say that the washers on my shock were not welded or brazed.
Regards Mac
 
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Deroberson

Active Website User
VOC Member
Thanks Mac, very helpful!

I found that the steel sleeve thru the rubber bushings retained the washers on either side with the same "circlips" that retain the collar on the fork spindles.

The rubbber bushings as you stated, should be easy to find a replacement. Now the order of the day is to find or fabricate a tool to compress the spring and still allow disassembly.

The key seems to be a correct tool and correct press.

Dave
 
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vince998

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Thanks Mac, very helpful!

I found that the steel sleeve thru the rubber bushings retained the washers on either side with the same "circlips" that retain the collar on the fork spindles.

The rubbber bushings as you stated, should be easy to find a replacement. Now the order of the day is to find or fabricate a tool to compress the spring and still allow disassembly.

The key seems to be a correct tool and correct press.

Dave

Hi Dave,
The rubber bushes i got from a suzuki dealer (for cars). I can´t find the reciept any more, but i´m sure it was for the little jeep they made (i bought them in 2001). While the lot was apart, i copied the washers & hollow dowel in stainless, and it´s held up till now. (the original shock is now gone, replaced with a spax unit i bought from Russel, but i used the bushes etc from the old shock to fit it)
The spring i removed with a contraption out of 1/4" plate and threaded bar i knocked up in the workshop (this was a while ago now so i don´t know if i still have it.) I know it took a while (and a lot of running away when the thing slips :rolleyes:)

My father had drilled a hole into the oil chamber, welded a bush on, and put a screw in. This i presume to change the oil every now and then. Because this shock was not designed to be opened, nobody knew what weight of oil or how much, so refilling was trial and error.

Just out of interest, i used the original spring on the spax as well (i had to lanish a couple of thou of the inside to get it to fit over the spax).
This spring has now had it. It´s ok 1 up with luggage, but as soon as the better half gets on (we weigh about 170 kilos together), the spring bottoms out on small bumps.
Anybody know where i could source a new spring for the spax, and what spring pressure it should have?
 

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