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E: Engine Comet Mongrel



Cyborg

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I would have expected a THICKER washer to give more 'head' room inside the cap.
It is counter intuitive, but if you resite some poetry first or smoke some weed, it will start to make sense. With the thinner gasket, it moves the thicker part of the cap (see 3rd photo above showing the area between the black and red marker) down so when the rocker is at the top of its arc it actually has a little more swing room. Similar (sort of) to having to make sure the rocker isn't a full lift when you unscrew the cap.... so it won't foul that thicker part. Anyway that's my story and I'm sticking to it....for now.....
 

vibrac

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In some cases it's better to get the wider portion of the cap further down the only time I have used extra washers is on the valve spring covers when using special valve springs
 

Bill Thomas

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It will all be worth it, The poor old Comet needs a bit more, " Get up and go". Just wish I could spend the time in the garage, And get mine done, I seem to have a Mental block, Stopping me from welding the Flywheels and boring them, Fear of messing up !!. Cheers Bill.
 

Cyborg

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It will all be worth it, The poor old Comet needs a bit more, " Get up and go". Just wish I could spend the time in the garage, And get mine done, I seem to have a Mental block, Stopping me from welding the Flywheels and boring them, Fear of messing up !!. Cheers Bill.
The only problem I foresee with the Mk2 is that I was originally going to use a Mk1, but if I remember correctly it had bushings that weren't quite true, so rather than replace the bushings, I just used a Mk2 that was sitting in the bin to save time.... not really thinking about the 7 point something to one piston I had already installed. I'm assuming it might turn out to be a bit of a turd until I get around replacing the piston with something that will generate some higher compression.... but just want to get this contraption running. As previously mentioned, if it turns out to be something that resembles a motorcycle and something that I actually like to ride... then I'll think about spending the money for the 600cc stuff.
Today I just shut my brain off and started drilling and polishing the beginnings of some rearsets. I also bought a folding kickstart lever for the Norton gearbox, but it was a bit disappointing in that there is no detent. It uses friction created by the bolt to keep it from flopping around. Not sure how that is going to work out.
Rearset.jpg Kick start lever.jpg
 

Cyborg

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In some cases it's better to get the wider portion of the cap further down the only time I have used extra washers is on the valve spring covers when using special valve springs
I hadn't come across it before even though the twin I have now and the one I used to own, both have Mk2 cams. It really is counter intuitive.... I would get it straight in my head that it needed a thinner gasket, but by the time I was leaving the garage and halfway up the stairs, I was second guessing myself. I had to go back and stare at it a while to get it to stick.
 

Cyborg

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I hope this is the final assembly for the engine plates and swingarm. The swingarm shaft goes through the frame and through the engine plates, so there is a bullet nosed piece of alloy stock temporally holding the swingarm and shims in place. The plan is to tap the shaft through, knocking the bullet nose shaft out while all 4 shims stay in place. Based on a trial fit without the shims (thrust washers), I figured I'd go mad trying to line up the engine plates, shims, swingarm, and frame, not to mention scratch everything in the process if I didn't do something to ease the process.

Swingarm assembly 5.2.jpg
 
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Cyborg

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The swingarm shaft going in and the bullet nosed alloy coming out. It actually worked without mangling any thrust washers!
Swingarm pivot install.jpg
 

Cyborg

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Speaking of primary drive covers for a Bob Newby belt drive, I made a plug today. Also made bucks for the oil tank and side cover. The belt drive plug is also sized so it will work as a buck if it turns out that I can actually form aluminum sheet. Oil tank and primary drive cover plugs.jpg
 

Cyborg

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Looks like good work for a slapper, at least to start. Do you have any slappers?

David
No and I knew what you meant, but looked it up just to make sure. I need to visit the local tool supply store and pick up a few things. I have a couple of hammers and dollys, but actual metal working stuff is limited. I did buy a planishing attachment for my air hammer. Who knows how it will go. I did anneal a test piece of the sheet just to see how malleable it gets and was surprised how workable it is compared to its original state.
 

davidd

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It looks like you can use the bucks as hammer forms, but you might want to do any heavy hammering off the bucks on metal and go back and forth. I have one wooden slapper with a leather face and 3 or so metal slappers. They can be purchased or made.


A "t" dolly for those corners would be nice.

David
 

Cyborg

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I'm assuming it will a least take a few tries to get the hang of even the simple shapes. I'm also assuming it will be hard to shrink the metal at the corners of the oil tank/side cover panels and it may require some metal to be removed and then stitched back together with the TIG. I'm entering unknown territory here and have been avoiding the subject by making a steering damper bracket, coil bracket, mounting a side stand and picking any other low hanging fruit that I can use as an excuse.
After seeing those wood slappers in the video, I checked inventory and there is a nice big chunk of 8/4 walnut.
 

Bill Thomas

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Can't you cut the large flat outer and then bend a strip of flat alloy all the way round, Then tig together, Maybe in a few sections, It would be a bit Square looking, But I think it would work.
Cheers Bill.
 

ClassicBiker

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Your other option is to make duplicates of the wood forms that you already have. Make them smaller by the radius you have on your current wood bucks. Trim your metal to shape but a little larger than the depth of you buck. Clamp the metal between the wood pieces and using a caulking tool and drive the metal over your buck. Essentially you are doing the work of a draw die. The wrinkles that you're worried about occurring from shrinking will end up on in the excess that you will trim off.
Steven
 

Cyborg

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Can't you cut the large flat outer and then bend a strip of flat alloy all the way round, Then tig together, Maybe in a few sections, It would be a bit Square looking, But I think it would work.
Cheers Bill.
My hope is to get a decent radius on the 3 side panels. 1 right side panel and two left side. Then take one left and one right and weld them together to form the oil tank.
Depending on how it goes, I may have to add a strip in between.
 

Cyborg

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VOC Member
Your other option is to make duplicates of the wood forms that you already have. Make them smaller by the radius you have on your current wood bucks. Trim your metal to shape but a little larger than the depth of you buck. Clamp the metal between the wood pieces and using a caulking tool and drive the metal over your buck. Essentially you are doing the work of a draw die. The wrinkles that you're worried about occurring from shrinking will end up on in the excess that you will trim off.
Steven
If I understand what you are saying, that is pretty much what option 2 is... although I don't know what you mean by a caulking tool. I have enough Cerrobend to make a female die and also have a decent sized hydraulic press. I ordered up enough alloy for quite a number of attempts so hopefully one way or another I'll come up with something other than fodder for yard art.
A fellow I know actually used cement to make a female buck to form wheel arches for an MG. It sounds bizarre, but his work is absolutely amazing.


Even if you aren't a MG fan, this is worth a look.

https://www.mgexp.com/phorum/read.php?1,3513512
 
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davidd

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I assume that you are welding the flat sides on, so the top is fairly straight forward. The less metal you have to deal with the better. You should be able to drape the aluminum over the top curve and then have a bit extra for you to trim off. I don't think you will have much trouble with the shapes. A slapper does a good job as a shrinker. Once you have got the top in shape keep it on the buck, then take a height gauge with a scribe held in it and run it around the buck scribing the aluminum where you will cut it off. You will have a nice even line for welding the flat sides onto.

AC Cars uses fiberglass Cobra bucks to make their aluminum bodies. They use certain portions as hammer forms as well.

David
 

Cyborg

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Thanks for the tip on the scribe. I'm guessing that using the two side panel bucks clamped together will give me an accurate way to form the flat piece that will be welded on after using a herd of small tacks. I tried using an electric shear to cut out the panels, but it's a bit of a wrestling match. Ok for cutting larger chunks off the sheet, but found it easier to finish them with the bandsaw.
 


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