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Comet ESA

Piston Pete

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Hi All .

I am in the process of reassembling the chaincase and primary drive on my humble Comet , in advance of the anticipated arrival of my Conway clutch .Bob Dunn repaired the chaincase ('tis a work of art now) ,and I am about to reassemble the ESA (with new springs).Reading the various bits of information ,I am unclear as to how far to tighten the ESA nut .Some recommend fully tightening the nut up -but surely this will lead to the ESA springs being ineffective ? Is there a recommended measurement between the outer plate and the body of the ESA . A previous owner has lockwired the outer nut ,and I will do the same.

Any advice ?:)
 

nkt267

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The springs won't be coil bound when you tighten every thing up.If you dont tighten it properly it can undo and try to bore it's way out of the chaincase.John
 

Comet Rider

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Comet ESA's

Hi Peter,

Definately do the ESA nut up tight, fully home. If you run it even slightly loose it will come loose and try to bore its way out:mad:

On both my dads Comet and mine we have flipped the spring retaining washer, so that any movement of the ESA does not put any sideways thrust on the springs, which can break them.

Best of luck
Neil
 

Len Matthews

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Yes, John is quite right, it must be really tight. Some people have suggested the PD5 Ring Plate should be fitted with the smooth side facing the springs. Not a good idea; The recesses that locate the springs are there for a purpose. I use a BSA fork tube nut spanner (from SRM) to tighten the ESA nut. It's a flat single hex tool of the right size so, armed with a copper faced hammer,you can get it really tight just like the old Villiers flywheel. No need to sprag the primary drive, just put the plug(s) in and work against compression. (Waits for horror-struck response)
 

John Cone

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I thought an inch drive impact gun would be suffice, bearing in mind one has to have access to a decent compressor.
 

deejay499

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Hi all. I thread some nylon rope into the bore with the piston down to lock the engine, and do the nut up with a good socket and bar, then wire lock as well. I would recommend everyone wire lock theirs. DJ
 

Len Matthews

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I thought an inch drive impact gun would be suffice, bearing in mind one has to have access to a decent compressor.
Yes, no doubt that would do the job, but there have been instances where the hexagon has parted with the rest of the nut and left the rider with no drive. If in doubt, invest in a new nut!
 

Piston Pete

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Wow ,what a response. Thanks everyone - I now understand that the nut must be really tight !! , but thats quite a variable measure!! ,does anyone have any recommendation as to the amount of thread that should be showing on the inside of the outer nut ,eg it should be tightened intill the threaded inner is flush with the hex nut? any photos of riders current set up would be appreciated .I should have photographed mine before I removed it ,but alas I didnt . :( I will be using locktite ,and it will be lockwired into position after I have tightened it .
 

timetraveller

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I hate to repeat myself but look at my response above. Assemble it without the springs first and you will see where the outer end of the nut ends up in relation to the end of the mainshaft. It has to go that far and then be tightened. Different nuts and different manufacturers of mainshafts mean that photos will not tell you how yours should look. Use the little grey cells as well as a long spanner and strong arms This, together with Loctite and locking wire, means you should be alright.
 

petermb998

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Peter
Do NOT use loctite.
You will live to regret it when you have to take the shock absorber off.
As you have been adviced tighten fully and wire lock the nut.


regards Peter Bromberg
 

clevtrev

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Consider also, that if it is not tight, the crank will be floating around inside the case, and then you`ll have another mess to sort.
 

ogrilp400

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Description

G'day Peter,
The nut does up tight against the washer PD8 which does up tight against PD4. Unless someone has shortened PD4 there will be a gap of approximately 5/16". timetraveller has it right.
Can Len explain why its not a good idea to turn PD5 around?. But he is right that the nut is not that substantial that there hasn't been examples that have parted.
Go ahead and use Loctite, there are many strenghts and so long as you don't use any of the higher grades it will come undone. Lockwire as well if you like.

Phelps.
 

Len Matthews

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
With the Comet there is a spacer between the outer main bearing and the engine sprocket. The Twin lacks this spacer and therefore the nut will be flush with the end of the mainshaft. Accordingly, the nut on the 500cc models appears to be only part way on. Having said that, some early Twin D/S mainshafts had short threads. Be careful with the grade of Loctite you use; too strong a grade will make subsequent dismantling very difficult. I recall Jack Barker telling me of a case where someone had used Loctiite on a Twin clutch nut which defeated all normal methods of removal including heat so he had to resort to drilling lots of holes in it and breaking it up.
 

Tom Gaynor

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Loctite

Recently I read that Loctite, in practical terms, slackens off at about 100 deg C. Pouring boiling water over it should be enough. Guess what? It's true. Try it. Or faff about wiring, risking the laughter of racers, who all use Loctite. OK, and who wire it too, just to be sure...
(Top tuning tip: if you wire it up with a SLACK wire, and on subsequent inspection you find the locking wire TIGHT, then you know it is trying to slacken, and you need to use Loctite. Where did I learn this? By examining a works MV.

Now I use a hot-air gun (currently on sale in Lidl at £9.99, and one of the great bargains of the century). Not only can I slacken Loctite, but I can shrink heat-shrink sleeving without setting fire to the bike.
And if you don't like Loctite, don't go on aeroplanes. They're held together with Loctite.
Peter
Do NOT use loctite.
You will live to regret it when you have to take the shock absorber off.
As you have been adviced tighten fully and wire lock the nut.


regards Peter Bromberg
 

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