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Cleaning out UFM / Oil Tank

Martyn Goodwin

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Following the big end failure on my Comet , while cleaning up the aftermath I have discovered significant amounts of metal sparkles and shards in the oil tank. With the tank removed I have flushed it a few times with Kero (Parafin) and the metal particles continue to be released. Due to the internal design of the oil tank I am wondering if any of you kind folk have discovered a sure fire way of getting the interior clean, short of cutting it open like a can of fish!

Martyn

PS - yes I am now about to flush ALL of the oil pipes, lines etc - what a mess.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Read the thread "OIl tank manhole installation"
this forum is getting to the point where the advanced search facility is quicker than asking

I used the search term UFM and clean


simples
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Hello Martyn, I am about to Do a oil tank, For a project, I plan to cut a 2" by 2" in the top of the frame, Blast it clean, Then weld it up, I think if it lasted 63 years befor, Another 60 years should see me out !! Cheers Bill.
 

Ken Tidswell

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
I have used a fluid which when mixed with the crud in the tank dissolves it and then it can be washed out with a pressure washer . Yuo have to make sure the tank is then dried to prevent corrosion. The amount of carbon, aluminium powder is amazing . there are others who use nuts and bolts and a cement mixer to agitate the tank with all the orifices blanked off . In the UK 'Jizer' or 'Gunk' are proprietry brands which will soften the residues in the oiltank,I do not know whether these products are available in Australia, which can them be pressure washed out, others have used Radiator repairers tanks to soften the solids, and clean the tank. i have a litre bottle of white spirit which was used initially to try and soften the deposits and it is still black after 12 months standing in the workshop I also have a Comet bigend where the annular ring is completely filled with residue this only came to light after the usual failure of the component.Ken T
 

stumpy lord

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Hi Martyn, Because the oil filer cap tube extnds below the top deck, and the outlet not only extends above the lower deck it is protected by a shroud, the only way to be sure that the oil tank is completely clear of rubbish is to cut a hole in the top of the tank. Having already introduced a de greasent you have already broken down the glue that was holding the crap that had accumalated over the years to the bottom of the tank. consequently when you drive the machine the rubbish in the oil tank will be constantly agitaed by the bumps in the road, stiring up the lighter metal flacks. You would be surprised by the things found in vincent oil tanks, glass marbels, lead solders, glass, wire, not to say anything about the sand, carbon, and various metals. Finally you must remember that any thing that shows in the preasure filter has come down from the oil tank, having first being deposited in the oil tank by the scavenge side of the pump.

So, I would not only recomend cutting a hole in the top of the oil tank, I would recomend fitting a secondary oil filer in the oil retun line to keep the rubish out of the tank.
stumpy lord
 

lar1949

Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
Chemically cleaning?

Has anyone ever tried services that chemically clean tanks? We have a local radiator shop that "boiles" out tanks. I had them clean and line a fuel tank and it looked great. The process does remove all the paint.
 

timetraveller

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
I tried Gunk, Jizer, petrol and paraffin without success. In the end I had to cut a hole for a man hole cover and use mechanical means (screw driver blade etc.) to literally scrape the solidified stuff off. Even then it needed a pressure washer (a steam cleaner might have been better) and several more days soaking before it was really clean. I think that I posted a drawing of the man hole cover when this subject was discussed before. Several local people have copied it and fitted one with complete success using either silver solder, epoxy or one of the above and screws as the securing method.
 

vincenttwin

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
I have the Conways manhole in my oil tank ,I had cleaned it ,then we had the hole cut and then you could see lots of metal and dried oil in the corners , cleaned it all out welded in the cover and good to go till the next time the engine comes down.
Peter
 

Magnetoman

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
cutting it open seems to be the only way to go.
Has anyone used a borescope to inspect the inside of a tank? Is there sufficient room to maneuver a borescope to see everywhere? I understand that if there is hardened junk in the crevices that cutting it open is likely the only way to remove the junk, but it would be nice to be able to inspect it after a "thorough" cleaning, before cutting, to see if surgery were needed.
 
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