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Cellulose paint & transfers

deejay499

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Hi all. We have just sprayed a tank using cellulose (No two pack facilities) and when we tried use acrylic lacquer over the transfers, they crinkle up.:(
Are there different types of transfers? or what is the answer, apart from two pack.
Thanks, Dave
 

mercurycrest

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Hi Dave,
Try just barely dusting the coats on. At least a half dozen or more, letting each one dry in between. I don't know if Brit paint is the same as ours, but that's what I've had to do.
Cheers, John
 

Bracker1

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
I'd try one of the catalyzed clears(2-pack) used in the base coat clear coat systems. They set as quickly as acrylic lacquers, polish well, and are fuel resistant, and typically don't wrinkle transfers. Lacquers yellow and are soften by the fuel and it's fumes, crack and misbehave.
Don't know why anyone uses lacquers at all anymore. Healthwise, all paint systems use carcinogenic solvents except the waterbase systems. So spray with caution. The days of shooting in the garage are coming to an end. In our area, the local community college lets people use their paint booth for a small fee. Good ventilation, access to respirators and chemical suits, good lighting, plus you'll minimize area pollution. Good luck with your spray job, and post some pictures of the finished tank/project. Safe riding, Dan
 

Bracker1

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Found your solution. Talked to a boat builder who uses UV resistant crystal clear epoxy. He brushes over the pinstriping etc with the epoxy and lets that cure. Then sprays with the clear lacquer with no problems. He buys the epoxy from the wood working stores. hope this helps, Dan
 

deejay499

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Thanks very much folks. It has given us a couple of more things to try. Incidentally, we found someone doing vinyl Vincent badges which may also be an answer. We will keep you updated.
Cheers, Dave
 

indianken

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
Dave,
Have a talk with your local auto body repair shop. They can clear coat, (in two pack over your color coat), your tank when they do there next paint repair job. Good for them, as every thing is already mixed and ready to go and good for you as they won't charge you for the full time and materials a separate job would take and the two pack clear can take a fuel spill.
Ken Smith
PS. Ask if one of the painters is a motorcyclist. Works for me.
 

peterg

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
Howdy Dave,

The most prolific painter of Vin tanks in the U.S. has his transfers done in vinyl. The problem with water slide transfers and solvent reaction is not the transfer itself but its adhesive.

Back when I shot my Red Rap tank below, I completely washed all the adhesives off my decals, trimmed back the clear edges almost to the color, adhered with watered down Elmer's glue and squigee'd them firmly. I then lightly heated the inside of the tank through the neck with a heat gun and then laid down one or two quick light wet coats of BASF/Glassurit's 21 line catalyzed enamel which flashed quickly resulting in no lifting. It's solvent dwell time during flash-off that kills these decals. Laying down dust coats can be risky in that you may experience clouding in these areas and applying your final wets generally chemically engages anything beneath it anyway and thus the lifting risk remains.

As we yanks sometimes use branding references to activities, I reckon "lacquering" might be a reference to vehicle orienting painting - as opposed to household - and y'all may very well be using enamel?? Hope so, lacquer never "cures" per se and being anywhere near a heat source (like your engine) will mean continual shifting with every heat cycle resulting in gloss flattening and evidence of lining from underlayer (body filler) shifting. It's solvent resistence is nil, you'll note it immediately turns to a liquid when wiped with anything even as benign as Brake Clean compared to enamel which may just peel back from the surface.

For the effort expended in lining and decals, if there was any piece on a Vin you'd want to go to the trouble of CE paints, it's your fuel tank. I just returned from the first AMCA meet of the season in Florida in which many there had their first introduction to 10% plus ethanol formulated fuel and it was tragic for some on our Road Run who inadvertantly splashed any on the faces of their tanks if not painted with CE.



vincent25.jpg
 
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deejay499

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Hi Peter. Thanks for all the info. We were beginning to suspect the adhesive on the decals as we have heard of someone having problems using two pack. Some useful info for our Information Officer and perhaps VOCS Liason officer.
We will probably go with the vinyl ones.
We have just heard that we will be getting Ethenol added to our petrol, so that will cause more problems.
Thanks again, Dave
 
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Comet Rider

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
VOC Member
Fuel and transfers

Hi Peter. Thanks for all the info. We were beginning to suspect the adhesive on the decals as we have heard of someone having problems using two pack. Some useful info for our Information Officer and perhaps VOCS Liason officer.
We will probably go with the vinyl ones.
We have just heard that we will be getting Ethenol added to our petrol, so that will cause more problems.
Thanks again, Dave

Hi Dave,

We've had Bio-(d)ethanol in our fuel since April 2008:mad:

Neil
 

peterg

Well Known and Active Forum Website User
Non-VOC Member
Howdy Chaps,

Not to exhaust this topic but on the subject of +10 ethanol content and your fuel tank, a problem we're experiencing more frequently here - in addition to gasket/o-ring swelling/deterioration - is tank liner degradation.

Once your version of our EPA has the upper hand in said formulations where catalytic converter preservation is concerned, unlike aviation or off-road use requirements which remain relatively stable, you'll be dealing with a dynamic for which few (no) conventional pour-in tank liner vendors can confidently tell you their product will work into the forseeable future.

Backing up before the painting part of the process, I'd restore tank integrity with welding/brazing in lieu of any liners.
 
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