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Bub 2012

TouringComet

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They had some rain which caused a shutdown, but I saw some run logs and Steve Hamel had a 157+ MPH run, which I think is close to or exceeds his previous best, and Max made one or two test runs before the rain. Renwick and Carlson are there as well. They are grooming the course and hope to open it up later today.
 

TouringComet

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Saw another run log that shows Steve Hamel in the mid-150's and I read a post on landracing.com that said Terry Prince's outfit (with Bones at the controls) went over 150. Congrats Terry and Bones!
 

Monkeypants

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142 rwhp finally gets thru to the salt!
Or part of it anyway, that bike may have more speed left in it still.
Glen
 

Comet Rider

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Latest on Max from Landracing.com

Some form of catastrophic failure, going back home to repair, but will be back on the salt next week for World of Speed.
 

TouringComet

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Steve Hamel had a run at just over 159, way to go Steve, getting close to the big 160.
 

TouringComet

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According to this blog he was aiming for 165. Good job though!
Yeah, last year, Tom Mellor took Steve's record at 163.303 MPH with a Trident. Tom's 750cc record is 159.903, better than Steve's old 1000cc record. I can't imagine Tom is getting as much or more horsepower than Steve, maybe the difference is aero.
 

TouringComet

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From Max, sent to his supporter email list, posted here with his permission:


Just walked in the door from my three day trip back. Here's a quick run down of our four race days at Bonneville.

Most all crew and supporters arrived on tech day, Barrie Howell, Richard Vanderwell, Bill Easter, Doris Endo, Eddie Saxton, Marty Dickerson, John Ulver, Irene Ulver, John Caraway, Don Angel, Sal ..., Hartmut Weidelich and his cousin Benny..., Max Re' Lambky, Kim Stuever, Robert Steele, Clyde..., Steve Williams, John and Carolyn McDougall, and others.

Tech day went smoothly. No problems. After tech day in the evening we did a trial push up with a dead plant. That all went quite well.

The next morning we planned to make a run early in the day. We found an electrical problem pertaining to the parachutes. This took the better part of the morning to trouble shoot. I decided to make only a two mile short run and turn out at the three mile to get a handle on the tune, using the new telemetry systems, exhaust gas temperatures and fuel/air ratio. As the engines run on straight alcohol we were looking for around a 5 to 1 ratio. Wind was a bit of a problem, but we did manage to get in two test runs to determine where we were at with the fuel/air ratio. No full passes were made on the first day of racing. About 5 pm a cloud full of rain decided to dump a bunch, and I do mean a bunch, of rain on the salt.

The second day of racing was a wash. We weren't allowed on the salt. Two racing days and we had only accomplished two two mile short bursts.

The third racing day, due to conditions, we weren't allowed on the salt until around 10 a.m. We did manage to get in two more two mile short bursts. On the first push up after the rain the course was so rough that the mercury switches fired the parachutes. We thought at first it was just the vibration, but on the second push up there was no doubt that the roughness of the salt was bouncing the back of the liner up and down quite viciously and indeed the mercury switches were firing the parachutes. I decided to undo the electrical of the mercury switches and go without them. As this is a safety feature I asked Hartmut if he would agree, and he did. We couldn't have made any more runs without the disconnect of the rollover switch.

The fourth racing day was designated for our first full pass. Servicing of the engines and doing a full service of the bike took an hour and fifteen minutes. I suppose we got it to the line about 9 a.m. There were eight bikes in front of us, and four bikes making return runs on the long course. That plus the wind, made it something like five p.m. before we made our first full pass of the Meet. The bike was pushed up and barely had enough power to move away from the push bumper. BL had no power, not anywhere close to past performance on full power runs. (She had once gone 275 mph unofficially, and officially holds an AMA and a SCTA record. Fastest timing slip 222+ mph, and the second fastest Vincent ever.) After spending a great deal of money on telemetry, sending injector components off for flow testing, and following Steve William's input, it all proved for naught.

I had always made three or four times the amount of horsepower than we were making now, just going by sound, plug readings, and a laser heat gun on the exhaust pipes.

Hartmut took BL through the traps in low gear at 130 mph. After the traps he didn't realize that the rough course would slow him down so quickly, and they wanted the liner to exit the course at the 10 mile, so Hartmut put it in second gear and motored on down to the 8 or 9 mile. When Stainless and I arrived in my F150 Ford chase vehicle, Hartmut was out of the bike, and the fire crew had removed the top bonnet over the engines. The reason for this is that when the fire crews approached he had seen flame escaping from the right hand seam where the top bonnet meets the lower belly pan. Hartmut didn't detect any smell or flame. By the time the bonnet was removed the minor flame was already out. It had extinguished itself. No extinguishing agents were used. The cause of the fire was that a breather line on number two cylinder had burnt a hole in it. The high heat causing the breather line to melt, came from extreme exhaust temperatures. The telemetry told us that the four exhaust temperatures ranged from 1400o to 1500o. An extreme amount of fuel was being burnt in the exhaust pipes, causing the high exhaust temperatures. A minor amount of oil from the breather line found it's way on to the exhaust pipe, which ignited and caused the minor fire.

The only fire damage was a burnt telemetry wire, and the melting of the paint job on the bonnet nearest the exhaust pipes. The engines escaped with damage only to the rocker arms. Heat transmitted from the extreme exhaust temperatures to the rockers turned them blue. This isn't the first time this has happened.

We took the liner back to the pits on day four. I went back to the nozzles and pill sizes and guestimated the barrel valve setting pretty much as what had made horsepower in the past. Fifteen minutes of work replaced the melted breather lines. We fired the thing up. It needed the idle to be set, but all in all the liner was ready to make another run.

About that time Hartmut and I had a heart to heart talk. Both of us had agreed prior to the 2012 Bub Meet that this would be the last time the liner would be run under our banner. We came to the conclusion that the tune of the liner wouldn't and couldn't be accomplished before the end of the meet. It was 5 p.m., we had only two hours left of day four, and day five would only give us six hours, as the meet was scheduled to close at noon, (meaning the bike had to be at pre-stage before noon), and at least an hour and a half of that would be used in a full check of the liner the morning of day five. We decided the liner was in good mechanical nick except for the blued rocker arms. Hartmut and I agreed that it would be best we leave the salt with the engines, transmission, all running gear and clutch, in good condition, as we both thought the tune was highly suspect, and could cause serious damage to the power plant.

Max
 
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