• Welcome to the website of the Vincent H.R.D. Owners Club.

    Should you have any questions relating to the Vincent H.R.D. Owners Club, or Vincent H.R.D. motorcycles in general, please contact Graham Smith, Hon. Editor and Webmaster by calling 07977 001 025 or please CLICK HERE.

    You are unrecognised, and therefore, only have VERY restricted access to the many features of this website.

    If you have previously registered to use this forum, you should log in now. CLICK HERE.

    If you have never registered to use this website before, please CLICK HERE.

E: Engine Blasting crankcases


greg brillus

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Like anything in restoration it is in the preparation that the final results will be either great or poor. It takes up huge amounts of time, but when done right , it ends well.
 

vin998

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
As these crankcases are a bit worst than a bit of oil stain and have some serious surface corrosion in places (but not eaten into the metalwork), my plan is:

Remove every item to leave just the cases absolutely bare, inc cylinder studs, spindles, oil pump sleeve, oil way blanking screws etc.
Clean / degrease with engine degreaser & power washer.
Remove gasket sealant from bottom of each hole
Vapour blast the cases, heads etc at a local company.
Keep cleaning away glass bead residue with power washer, compressed air , small pipe cleaners for oilways and keep going until I'm 100% sure every last bead has been removed.
Then and only then, start the rebuild.

As for using spint stripper etc, have you tried using what is described as paint stripper in the UK now? All the active chemicals have been banned and removed so what is sold as paint stripper today should really be prosecuted under the trade description act.

Simon
 

greg brillus

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I seriously doubt they will simply vapor blast the cases without them being bead blasted first. The vapor blasting simply does not have the strength to remove difficult stains or similar whereas the bead blasting will. In any case I strongly suggest you remove the pump sleeve, you will find it extremely difficult to successfully mask off the timing side area enough to stop grit (either from beads or the vapor blasting medium) getting in behind the upper cavity beyond the pump sleeve. I'd hate for you to make an expensive mistake..........
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
As long as it's clean inside after washing, Who is going to see the stain, Outside I would wire brush then wet and dry by hand.
I cleaned off some salt problems like this and was pleased.
We did a Bike that had been sand blasted some time ago, Not by us, And thought it was clean, But after pumping some oil around, We soon found it needed more !!, I would not sand blast again.
Cheers Bill.
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
For stripper, you would probably have to see what's available for industrial use. Any aircraft maintenance bases around your area? They would know what is available. Who knows you might find someone sympathetic to your cause. If you can't find anything perhaps they can suggest something else. If I hadn't had such success with my Commando cases, I wouldn't be a promoter of chemical strippers and hate abrasive blasting so much. When I was done with the cases, they looked exactly like they did when they came out of the factory mold. The surface was perfectly clean and not altered in any way and they looked like they would pass for NOS. Perfect for restoration and no worries about abrasives hiding anywhere. I wish I could find that same stripper.
You could try cleaning a few pieces in a bath of oxalic acid and see if you like the results. It should still be available there in dry form and you can mix it to whatever strength you want. Plus it will come in handy for cleaning other things. Easier to dispose of afterwards.... diluted enough, its no worse than tossing out your rhubarb leaves. On this timing cover, it goes from.. as is, to B15 stripper, to oxalic acid bath. It will give slightly different results depending on the alloy, so something to keep in mind if doing a test.

26023
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Oxalic acid? If I remember from my wine making days that's the acid in rubarb ....... Now there is an idea!
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Actually when I needed some to remove some iron particles from car paint... the supplier was only set up to sell large quantities. He said go get some rhubarb leaves and toss them in the blender. I tried it and had limited success. I think the wood working folk use oxalic acid as well. Better to get in powdered form and mix your own... I mostly use it as a rust remover before tossing whatever it is into the ultrasonic cleaner.
 

Nigel Spaxman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I bead blasted mine. Someone had done it before anyway. The main thing is to clean really well to make sure no media is left inside. There aren't many holes anyway. Blow everything out with air. Remove all blanking plugs so there are no blind holes that could hold media. Then use soapy water and clean all passages with pipe cleaners. Use some brake clean as well. After it is dry check for media with more pipe cleaners, if there is any do it all again. I think people who had trouble must not have cleaned the media out. Even if you use soda blasting or dry ice blasting there can still be dirt in any of those holes. Probably the worst thing that could be inside your engine is alumimum oxide particles.
 

genedn

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I seriously doubt they will simply vapor blast the cases without them being bead blasted first. The vapor blasting simply does not have the strength to remove difficult stains or similar whereas the bead blasting will. In any case I strongly suggest you remove the pump sleeve, you will find it extremely difficult to successfully mask off the timing side area enough to stop grit (either from beads or the vapor blasting medium) getting in behind the upper cavity beyond the pump sleeve. I'd hate for you to make an expensive mistake..........
I would also be looking strongly for corrosion of the aluminum. As those cases look fairly well beaten up buy the elements. Having worked with aluminum on seaplanes and repairs of them its often that the separation / corrosion is not visible or slightly visible from the surface. As good clean as proposed would give an indication of damage if any.

Thoughts?
 

Mr. Boring

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Here's an example of a nut rusted rocker cover from a BSA. I was cleaned in a industrial washer with an aluminum cleaning detergent that won't react to aluminum like some dishwasher detergents do. It was then soaked in a derusting solution like evaporust for 6 hours then rinsed. I doesn't have the issues of some acids making a raw fast rusting steel. It won't attack most paints if used for moderate times. Good for sympathetic reconditioning. If you look close you will notice the natural shine that the casting had between the corrosion.
 

Attachments

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I found out today why Monster energy sponsors motorcycle events
put a can of that in a ultrasonic bath and see how clean the alloy part gets....
not a lot of good for crankcases especially with the Big Nannys sugar tax
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Here's an example of a nut rusted rocker cover from a BSA. I was cleaned in a industrial washer with an aluminum cleaning detergent that won't react to aluminum like some dishwasher detergents do. It was then soaked in a derusting solution like evaporust for 6 hours then rinsed. I doesn't have the issues of some acids making a raw fast rusting steel. It won't attack most paints if used for moderate times. Good for sympathetic reconditioning. If you look close you will notice the natural shine that the casting had between the corrosion.
I know I'm a little different, but in some situations, I have used that dishwasher detergent reaction. This head was blasted in the distant past, but still (to me) had a really harsh looking bright blasted surface. A run through the dishwasher gave it a more natural aged look. The photo and the lighting make it look a little different, but again to me, it looked a lot less out of place.

26059
 

Mr. Boring

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I found out today why Monster energy sponsors motorcycle events
put a can of that in a ultrasonic bath and see how clean the alloy part gets....
not a lot of good for crankcases especially with the Big Nannys sugar tax
I know some have used molasses for animal feed to get the same results for
rusting problems but it's another what will work and how fast. Maybe a 60 year
old basalmic vinegar would give the perfect trifecta cleaner. Acid, sugar and the proper decade. :)
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
That POR 15 metal prep works well for rust removal and unlike the oxalic acid it leaves the surface protected.
Anyone else have good results with a cleaner for the ultrasonic bath. I've only used simple green degreaser and not thrilled with the results, but it could be the cheap machine. Does the monster energy drink really work that well?
 

Mr. Boring

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I'm with you Cyborg on the Simple Green not being thrilled with the results. While it cleans some things okay, I've used it in a ultrasonic cleaner with so so job. It will eat at aluminum after a while and turn it darker. Learned the hard way.
 

vin998

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
How's the case cleaning going Simon?
They have been stripped to absolutely bare alloy castings including oilway blanking screws removed etc and the first degrease done. I have tried several alloy cleaners and they are not having any effect so I have decided its dry blast in my blasting cabinet to remove the corrosion and then get a local company to vapour blast to get a decent sealed finish. I'm taking photos at each stage and will post them here, but it may be a week or two as I have other things on the go as well such as get the blasting cabinet working properly as there appears to be a blockage somewhere.
 

yorchie

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Milkstone Remover used by dairy farms worldwide. Bathroom cleaners use phosphoric acid in ingredients but in lower quantity and you pay a lot for small bottle. Great for taking off rust and corrosion by hand (especially rims and spokes) with a stainless steel scrubby or Green 3M scrubber. Also use for gas tanks to clean out rust. And you can impress your partner when you clean the toilet and shower !

Poor mans Ultrasonic Bath - fill up a bucket with cleaner. Put your item in bucket. Fire up air compressor with hand held air blower attachment and start making some bubbles.

Here is link to UK supplier but am sure any dairy would let you have some and then you can get a tour of a modern dairy and see some amazing technology.


Removes milkstone from bulk tanks, pipeline cleaners, pipeline, milking machines, utensils, and other dairy equipment. Contains phosphoric acid with non-foaming wetting agents for fast penetration of milkstone and hard water deposits. Easy on metals and glassware.
 

Top