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Misc: Everything Else Birmabright Welding

998charlie

Website User
VOC Member
I've a Series D open Shadow which has developed a split in the rear Birmabright mudguard. Does anyone know of a good welder (West Midlands preferably) who could repair it.
Thx Charlie
 

Magnetoman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
it needs NG6 alloy welding rod.
I hadn't seen the term NG6 before but I see it's a MIG wire that has the same composition as the 5356 TIG filler I have for Birmabright. Most of the hits for NG6 seem to be in the UK, whereas most U.S. hits that have the term have it in a footnote to 5356 listings so it doesn't seem to be in common use on this side of the Atlantic. Not that the OP is on this side of the Atlantic...
 

Magnetoman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I've heard of people taking a bit of a knackered fender and using it as welding rod. Remember there is a little magnesium in there.
Some people probably used a slice of beer can as a welding rod and managed to get it to sort of hold the Birmabright together, but that doesn't make it right. The welding process typically alters the base metal and the composition of the filler rod is designed to compensate for that effect to result in the strongest weld possible. Specifically, the most common "Birmabright" alloy had ~2% Mg whereas the 5356 filler recommended for welding it has ~5%.
 

998charlie

Website User
VOC Member
and after thats done, i always glue a patch (old birmabright) with araldite behind it to avoid further cracks.
Thanks all for the comments and suggestions. I'll keep you posted, as I've not had any success with local Stratford welders (they havent heard of Birmabrite and certainly haven't a clue about welding it!) Even the Dunsfold Landrover centre, once the font of all knowledge hadn't got a clue. I ended up with a salesman who started waffling about impurities in Birmabrite (which I believe he heard the name from me for the first time!!)
 

Vsb

New Website User
VOC Member
If you are really stuck, a friend who is a specialist welding engineer/ aircraft restorer does all sorts of odd welding jobs. I remember him welding vintage aluminium Alvin crankcases, magnesium Hewland Ferrari transaxle, anything stainless/cast iron/aluminium. Richard Kimberley Services in Lawford, Essex. He is a one man operation but answers phone/ email.
 

Glenliman

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
If they don't know what Birmabright is, you might try calling it 5052.
They are similar alloys with 5052 being a common item today, at least in North America.
One of the common filler rods for 5052 is 5356.
The Land Rover resto people generally use 5052 with 5356 filler when welding patches into their Birmabright bodied Land Rovers.


Glen
 

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