• Welcome to the website of the Vincent H.R.D. Owners Club.

    Should you have any questions relating to the Vincent H.R.D. Owners Club, or Vincent H.R.D. motorcycles in general, please contact Graham Smith, Hon. Editor and Webmaster by calling 07977 001 025 or please CLICK HERE.

    You are unrecognised, and therefore, only have VERY restricted access to the many features of this website.

    If you have previously registered to use this forum, you should log in now. CLICK HERE.

    If you have never registered to use this website before, please CLICK HERE.

Misc: Everything Else Bent Crash Bars

viacavour

New Website User
VOC Member
I have a 1955 Black Knight with bent crash bars.

Need dimensional drawings in order to straighten or any other suggested remedy.

Are new crash bars available?
 

Graham Smith

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Administrator
VOC Forum Moderator
My favourite crashbars are the ones the spares company sell with the hexagon ends.

All stainless, they just look the part. Part number CB1SS

F8D71BA1-69C4-420E-80CD-BFDB200C87E6.jpeg


They also sell the series d ones

FT293AS-L&RSeries 'D' Crash Bars - Pair
Pair of crash bars for the Black Prince/Knight.
Finished in Primer with the engine cover mounting lugs undrilled for you to get them in the correct position.



 

Ian Savage

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
The ones on ebay do not appear to have the engine plates attached.

Graham, you can't use the straight bar for a 'D'.
 

Sakura

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
With the straight crash bar, if you come off, what are the chances of the bar bending the ufm and/or damaging the bottom edge of the petrol tank?
 

bmetcalf

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I've tested mine twice and there was no tank or UFM damage. The exhaust, handlebar end, and footrest suffered, though.
 

Gary Gittleson

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Graham, you can't use the straight bar for a 'D'.
True, I suppose for an enclosed D. They work just fine for an open one. I made mine out of stainless threaded rod, tubing and nuts. Either the club didn't have them at the time or I didn't know they did. Polishing the tubing was a lot of work.

Ignore the ducks. They're just showing off.

Gary
 

Attachments

robin

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
If you make a set of 'D' crash bars, ensure that you are able to remove the exhaust pipes without having to take the R/H crash bar off first.. This was a major problem with the originals.
Robin
 

timetraveller

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
My solution to this on the prototype, long before I knew it to be the prototype, was to cut through the lower end of the right hand crash bar about one inch from where it is welded to the lower plate. A solid steel rod was then welded into the lower end of the upper part and was threaded internally, probably 3/8 BSF. This solid rod would slide into the remaining short piece of tube. A steel bolt could be inserted from behind the lower plate and screwed in to the inserted rod. A tapered washer ensured that the bolt head was at right angles to the line of the bolt and when the bolt was tightened up it pulled the upper part, plus spigot, into the short part. To remove the exhaust pipe one only had to undo the hexagon headed bolt and very slightly pull outwards the long upper part. The crash bar has never been tested by sliding down the road on it but it must be about as strong as before it was modified.
 

MartynG

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
With the straight crash bar, if you come off, what are the chances of the bar bending the ufm and/or damaging the bottom edge of the petrol tank?
From my experience at a 70 mph 'off' the UFM is not at risk. The threaded 'joiner' in the middle seems to be of a non tensile material and in my case it bent.

Not so me!!!! I broke.
 

b'knighted

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
My solution was similar to Norman’s in that the bottom of the right crash bar has a loop of solid bar around the exhaust pipe. This bar, welded into the crash bar tube, is threaded to take a nut either side of the engine plate. To remove it the top “sidecar” fitting bolt must be removed as must the inner bottom nut but the bolts through the crankcase do not have to be disturbed.
It has been tested by throwing the bike down the road on ice and in combination with a Primmer's finest pannier saved my leg and most of the bike.
 

Top