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Assembling crankcases


tractorman414

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
any tips on engaging crankshaft rollers into outer races. I know I’ve done this a couple of times before, and don’t remember much of a problem. Talking to other member of the Dorset section we believe it has become more difficult after the bearing manufacturers changed from using nicely engineered brass cages to the pressed out steel ones, which don’t keep the rollers close to the inner track.

Amongst the methods suggested include using cotton thread/elastic/copper wire to wind tight around the roller assembly, all these aids can be broken/extracted through to crankcase mouth, once the rollers have started to engage with the outer race

any better ideas ?
 

stumpy lord

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Yes,
a nice claggy grease, no danger of leaving half a rubber band in your engine.
stumpy lord.
 

ET43

Guest
The elastic band job

Thank you Norman for the mention of leaving an elastic band in the crank case. P.E.I says it is ok to use this method, only he didn't say to measure the blasted thing before use, and after you've got it out of the crank case.
I managed to kill my engine with half an elastic band. Buy me a pint and I'll tell you the story.
Cheers, ET43
 

Len Matthews

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Another way is to put the inner part of the bearings in the outer race in the crankcases first rather than on the mainshafts. You can then use the ESA nut threads and various spacers to draw the drive-side shaft through the bearings. On the timing-side you can use a soft (e.g alloy) tubular drift on the oil pump worm to seat the bearing against the flywheel.
 

John Appleton

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
it has become more difficult after the bearing manufacturers changed from using nicely engineered brass cages to the pressed out steel ones, [/quote]

The bearing manufacturers have not changed from nicely engineered brass ones . These are readily available and are recommended for use " in high speed or high vibration applications " . They are of course more expensive , but we always use them in our engines .

John
 

deejay499

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Hi all. The method that I have always used and was taught when I first started to play with Vincents is to leave the empty half on the bench, supported so that there is room for the shaft to go through, and lower the crankcase half with the flywheel into it. If the bearings are greased and the top of the rollers are pulled out a bit, they form a slight taper to enter into the empty half, and usually drop straight in. Works for me. Another pair of hands can help but it can be done on your own. Cheers
 

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