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Anyone know of a source for a spark plug cleaner

BlackLightning998

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Evening All,

So now I have quite a few sooty plugs....

I recall years ago you could buy a little device that plugged into the 12 volt battery and cleaned spark plugs.

I've scoured the web, google and ebay - can't find anything other than a device to plug into an airline (which I don't have).

Anyone have a recommendation for quick and easy spark plug cleaning - and wher can I get one?

Cheers

Stuart
 

jueledwards

Website User
Non-VOC Member
Spark Plug Cleaner

In the USA there is JC Whitney catalog automobile supplies which usually has one or two types. One type runs on compressed air but the other type has a 12 volt motor that throws the sand around inside. Don't over-do it; sand just enough to get off the carbon. When "modern" insulator materials were first used in the 50s or 60s some said there could be no more sand blasting of plugs. They also stated that "reading plugs" was not going to be easy anymore.
 

Pete Appleton

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Administrator
Plug Blasting

Stuart
Modern plugs don't seem to take well to sand blasting. I would suggest that you go back to the NGK plugs but use BP6ES. The important thing is the 'P' in the part number, this means 'Protruding' and refers to the centre electrode and insulator. The electrode is moved out from the partially shielded position into the combustion area and as a result tends to stay cleaner. There is plenty of clearance on a standard setup but it is worth checking before you kick it over.

It could be said that this is only masking an underlying problem with your sooting up but the other great advantage is that they are a very common car spark plug and can be bought for about £1.50 each from motor factors. You can certainly buy a lot of them for the price of a spark plug cleaner.
 

BlackLightning998

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Thanks Pete - order placed...

Hi Pete,

I have got myself equipped with a range of plugs to try including the NGK BP6ES and so will keep the Forum posted on how I get on.

I've going to try an Iridium plug (protruding) or projected as they describe it - they are £7 each but is they sort my problems out I will be well happy with that.

Thanks for taking time to reply - much appreciated.

Regards

Stuart

Stuart
Modern plugs don't seem to take well to sand blasting. I would suggest that you go back to the NGK plugs but use BP6ES. The important thing is the 'P' in the part number, this means 'Protruding' and refers to the centre electrode and insulator. The electrode is moved out from the partially shielded position into the combustion area and as a result tends to stay cleaner. There is plenty of clearance on a standard setup but it is worth checking before you kick it over.

It could be said that this is only masking an underlying problem with your sooting up but the other great advantage is that they are a very common car spark plug and can be bought for about £1.50 each from motor factors. You can certainly buy a lot of them for the price of a spark plug cleaner.
 

Tom Gaynor

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Spark plug cleaner

I have one (a cleaner) which works off ecologically sound elbow grease. It consists of a tube about 5" long and 14 mm tapping size ID, full of steel rods about 0.030" diameter about 4" long. The cap has the same thread as a spark plug. Unscrew cap, screw in plug, shake vigorously for what always seems a VERY long time, then remove now cleaned plug. I think it was made by Champion before they realised that telling the truth, that plugs will last tens of thousands of miles if cleaned, and filed to have sharp edges and flat faces, wasn't good for business. Always makes me think of how furious Gillette must have been when Wilkinson produced a stainless steel blade that didn't rust and therefore didn't go blunt in three days and they (Gillette) were forced to follow......but quick to recover, they now sell "blade cartridges" so you buy 4 or 5 blades at one time. Me? I have a Phillishave. And very old spark plugs.
 

nkt267

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Found this on Ebay...
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/VINTAGE-CLASS...rkparms=72:12|39:1|65:12&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14
 
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