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A: Oil Pipework A65 Oil hose



Mr. Boring

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#41
Sorry I was asleep at the wheel and didn't see the inquiry.

I got my pair 20 years ago from a welding supply store that's used for crimping welding hoses. It is a visegrip brand which I believe is still available. There are cheaper generic sets out there too. A web search will uncover lots of sources that might be easier to obtain for one's locale. Ferrules in stainless or silver cad plated brass should be easy to find through the internet or a hose supply house.


https://www.amazon.com/d/Wire-Crimp...06&sr=8-4&keywords=Ferrule+Crimping+Tool+hose
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#42
Got plenty of mole grips just need some hole dimensions for the jaw to grind out;)
I must say though that many of my bikes came with ferrules just pushed over the rubber and perfectly sealed I guess that secret is the perfect hose and ferrule sizes
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#44
It seems the Americans are all about to invent a new US Vincent "standard" of "crimped oil/petrol lines".

Ferrules were never crimped, they don't need to be and they shouldn't be.

Peter B
I think that you may well be right Peter certainly with ferrules from spares company and correct hose in fact I think it's the one thing that is helped by modern petrol as the pipe ' grows' in the ferrule:rolleyes:
 

peter holmes

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#45
I think Peter B is 100% correct, having purchased my first Vincent in 1965 the nearest I got to dealing with the original factory was Furness and Searle, ex Vincent employees that had a business repairing, servicing and restoring Vincent Motorcycles in Cromer, Hertfordshire, they most definitely did not crimp, they pushed the rubber pipe into the ferrule and then pushed the metal pipe into the rubber with a little Wellseal applied to the outside of the metal pipe, ensuring that the end of the metal pipe is not sharp or ragged, ideally a little rounded on the end so as not to damage the internal bore of the rubber, I also saw them reduce the outside diameter of the herringbone rubber a little on a grinding wheel if it was a little to tight to push into the ferrule.
 

Mr. Boring

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#46
It seems the Americans are all about to invent a new US Vincent "standard" of "crimped oil/petrol lines".

Ferrules were never crimped, they don't need to be and they shouldn't be.

Peter B
Sorry I wasn't trying to ruffle any feathers. Just adding a way to attach hoses that looks more tidy than hose clamps. I do not know how they were originally on a Vincent that is what these forums are about to help us learn. I do know that the ferrule crimping method was used with other British bikes in the 60s at the factory.
 

A_HRD

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#47
Sorry I wasn't trying to ruffle any feathers. Just adding a way to attach hoses that looks more tidy than hose clamps. I do not know how they were originally on a Vincent that is what these forums are about to help us learn. I do know that the ferrule crimping method was used with other British bikes in the 60s at the factory.
Absolutely no feathers ruffled and no offence taken! :) After 50 years of messing with Vincents (not just my own), I like to impart some of the knowledge I've gained - and yes the Forum is ideal for this. I'm with you too on hose clamps - horrendous looking things - often of dubious effectiveness. Paired-up and fitted carefully, as indicated by Peter Holmes at #45, original style hoses and ferrules will remain effective for decades.

Peter B
 

Mr. Boring

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#48
Got plenty of mole grips just need some hole dimensions for the jaw to grind out;)
I must say though that many of my bikes came with ferrules just pushed over the rubber and perfectly sealed I guess that secret is the perfect hose and ferrule sizes
The diameter of the pliers is .550" and a ferrule is .562" . .012" crush fit. I would get a handful of .750" long ferrules and see how your tool compresses for the snugness and look you want. :)
 

Texas John

Active Website User
Non-VOC Member
#49
Some ferrules need to be crimped. If there is pressure, e.g. flow to the heads, they should be crimped. Fuel lines (gravity pressure) and the return oil line to the oil tank, they do not need it, so one can just stuff the line into the ferrule and slide it on (assuming good fit on line and inside ferrule). And I think I read somewhere that was how it was done at the Vincent factory.
 

Black Flash

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#50
We all know that the Vincent oil pump is far from creating pressure, it creates - by modern comparison - a constant dribble.
I have always fitted pipes and ferrules as described in post #45 usually thining the outside of the hose with a Stanley knife. Not good looking and not high tech but covered by the ferrule. I have never had a leaking joint at all.
Also there will never be pressure to blow the hose off with our oil pumps.
Bernie
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#51
Not sure about that Bernie, With a long flex pipe on my comet, You can see the oil pumping !.
Also I have been told that metal pipes that have been chromed, have had the flex pipe pop off !.
Cheers Bill.
 

BigEd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
#52
It is generally accepted that fluids are incompressible. An oil pump will create little to no pressure in an oil pipe with an open end. An oil pump pumping to an oil pipe with a small orifice at the end is likely to create more pressure. What would happen to an oil pipe with a blocked orifice assuming that the oil pump was not so worn that there was a lot of bypass?
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#54
I guess a blocked pipe would do it but certainly I have known machines for years that have had push on ferrules BUT it is essential the pipe and ferrule are a good match - as they were when originally fitted
 


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