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A: Oil Pipework A65 Oil hose



davidd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#21
I use regular fuel/oil hose from the auto parts store. I also tend to use banjos on the engine unless I have an old collapsed oil pipe I can cut off.

I buy a brass pipe bushing for the UFM and cut the threads off and run the correct die down it to install it in the oil tank. I install a male barb the correct size for the hose in the bushing. (Can be seen in second photo). Almost all the small parts for the racers have to made up or salvaged. The good parts go to the street bikes.
100_0488.jpg
I believe that is a 1/2" hose on the feed and a 5/16" hose on the scavenge to match the pipes on the head.
100_1590.jpg
I try to match things up, but you can get away with a slight mismatch, but not a large one.
100_1531.jpg

David
 

Cyborg

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#24
Works for me, so perhaps something to do with you being on the wrong side of the pond? You could try going to greenlinehose.com and enter ABA into the search function.
 

Texas John

Active Website User
Non-VOC Member
#29
I think the oil lines on my 1948 Rapide are original, since I have had it since 1974, and the lines have ferrules on them. If replaced in USA back before then, and the love this bike was getting, they would have hose clamps, not ferrules. Anyway, they are not Herringbone, although they are rough not smooth, with the appearance that they were wrapped in cloth (like rough bed sheet material) in the mold and the cloth was removed after they were made. I hope that makes sense.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#30
Here is what I use with a pair of blunted pincers I think the UK name is double eared O clips 1540364505928.png
they come in various sizes once again its worth saying again that we are not dealing with modern oil pressures or even pre unit triumph oil pressures
 

Mr. Boring

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#32
Add these to the mix for holding hoses. May not be the best in all applications but with a barbed fitting they look very tidy.
41d3+lC3XRL__SL500_AC_SS350_.jpg HF2018.jpg 1956 BSA Goldstar Clubman DBD34G motor LeMay ACM.JPG
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Normski

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
#34
Here is what I use with a pair of blunted pincers I think the UK name is double eared O clips View attachment 24548
they come in various sizes once again its worth saying again that we are not dealing with modern oil pressures or even pre unit triumph oil pressures
Pliers for squeezing up CV boot clips are quite cheap to buy and make a good job crimping these. They push against the flats of the ear at the same time as squeezing the side.
 

Texas John

Active Website User
Non-VOC Member
#35
The ferrules to the 5/16 oil lines on my 1948 Rapide have 2 crimps on opposite side, running most of the length of the ferrule (not around the ferule). The ferrules are gray in color, not brass, although they could be brass that has been plated with cadmium or zinc or something.
 

Texas John

Active Website User
Non-VOC Member
#37
Yes. What tool did you use to make them? I added a photo of one of my oil lines (you can see the texture) and its ferrule. My fuel lines were replaced long ago with the clear plastic fuel line of the day (early 70s), and they are now yellow-brown, very hard, and non-flexible (and no ferrules or clamps on them).
 

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