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"A" Comet Side stand


Clay

Active Website User
VOC Member
Hi,

Could anyone tell me the correct length that the sidestand on a Series A Comet should be?

Mine was very bent so I had it straightened as you can see below but it is still about an inch and a half too short. I saw one advertised and I asked the seller to measure it for me from the centre of the pivot hole to the base and he said it was 9" which is exactly the same as mine. If that's the case, I'm wondering why mine is too short to support the bike?
IMG_7621[1].jpg
IMG_7624[1].jpg
 

A_HRD

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Clay,

The side-stand length problem has been a bone of contention for decades on the 'A'. The late great Bob Stafford had small batches cast (SG iron) over the years which had a long, chunky, solid cylinder on the lower end allowing upto about 1.5 inches extension (cut off any unwanted length).
I have a repro one from another source (unknown) and that is similar at 10.5 inches.
If you have deep pockets, you could buy a longer one from Michael Breeding (USA). It's very strong but, WTF, he made it with a 5/8ths pivot hole instead of 9/16ths. You could make a very thin bush but the hole is not very linear in its finish - and you don't want to take it out any bigger (for strength reasons). Your other option is to make a special shouldered stud/bolt for it.

Why the length problem in the first place? Well, that is probably lost in the mists of time, but when we restore these bikes we often fit bigger wheels (mine are 21/20), longer/stronger Brampton spring (or B Bramptons) and rear springs or different tyres. These things add to what already problematic from Day 1.

With any luck, someone might offer you a longer stand, but regrettably I can't help you at this time. Meanwhile, carve yourself a neat bit of wood that will fit in your Barbour-jacket pocket!

Nice looking Comet by the way, will you treat us to a photo of t'other side please?

Peter B
 

Vincent Brake

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
original ones are a bit closer to the bike, i would just weld the shortage up, as its better to have it further out, i always need to check every stop if it would be o k
 

Robert Watson

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
My A had what appeared to be its original stand. I cut the foot off, welded a 1 1/2 inch length of bar stock in the middle, and then took the grinder to it to blend in the profile. I think 1 1/4 would have been better, but it still works OK, but the stand always goes on the downhill side!
 

greg brillus

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I don't think the factory ever come to grips with how a stand should support the bike correctly, the pivot for the "A" side stand should have been at an angle to swing the stand out further away from the centerline of the machine. Contact Neal Videan for a new longer stand in alloy and not too expensive, only need to remove small amounts of material for the up/down stops to suit your machine. Cheers................Greg.
 

Dinny

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
This is one of Mikes stands. The hole is machined to 5/8 and bushed bringing it down to 1/2. I will just make a special pivot stud for it.

Cheers Mark
 

Attachments

Marcus Bowden

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Like Peter says it all depends on wheel sizes and springs fitted. Years ago I turned up an elephants foot 2"long leaving it square on the bottom and recessed in the top with a long 1/4" whit Alan screw tapped up into the leg. That was OK for a few years until the Scandinavian jaunt when I had a series of front wheel punctures and a bearing seizure all in the front, getting the bike onto the rear stand is a real PIG single handed & loaded, so adopting the Indian center stand deployment method one puts out the side stand pulls the bike over even further, then leaning over by the kick starter pull out the center stand and stand bike upright . But to get at the rear stand is quite a task with panniers, top-box & fuel & oil tanks on an "A". Tying a bunggy on the stand bottom with a lot of tension to the gear leaver or as low as possible, leaning the bike over so much until the stand flicked forward as they lift the rear wheel more than 4", that trip it was done a couple more times consequently it's got quite a bow legged appearance, a second Petifer spring was fitted so required more height and a little more stability so a 5" x 2" x 1/4" thick aluminum checker plate was applied, keep promising myself that I will remove it and put it into the forge and straighten it out.
I certainly don't have the patients to carry a piece of custom made wood chock to bugger about with every time I parked, OK for a Sunday ride out to the pub park it have a beer/meal talk about it and ride home and it was only the wood that was the centre of conversation !
bananaman
 

Bill Thomas

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Like Peter says it all depends on wheel sizes and springs fitted. Years ago I turned up an elephants foot 2"long leaving it square on the bottom and recessed in the top with a long 1/4" whit Alan screw tapped up into the leg. That was OK for a few years until the Scandinavian jaunt when I had a series of front wheel punctures and a bearing seizure all in the front, getting the bike onto the rear stand is a real PIG single handed & loaded, so adopting the Indian center stand deployment method one puts out the side stand pulls the bike over even further, then leaning over by the kick starter pull out the center stand and stand bike upright . But to get at the rear stand is quite a task with panniers, top-box & fuel & oil tanks on an "A". Tying a bunggy on the stand bottom with a lot of tension to the gear leaver or as low as possible, leaning the bike over so much until the stand flicked forward as they lift the rear wheel more than 4", that trip it was done a couple more times consequently it's got quite a bow legged appearance, a second Petifer spring was fitted so required more height and a little more stability so a 5" x 2" x 1/4" thick aluminum checker plate was applied, keep promising myself that I will remove it and put it into the forge and straighten it out.
I certainly don't have the patients to carry a piece of custom made wood chock to bugger about with every time I parked, OK for a Sunday ride out to the pub park it have a beer/meal talk about it and ride home and it was only the wood that was the centre of conversation !
bananaman
I am having too many (bad back days ), So when I have to use the rear stand on a "C", I roll the rear wheel on to a bit of wood first, Not too thick, It helps me a lot. Cheers Bill.
 

Marcus Bowden

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Not having fitted a center stand yet on my favorite bikes but when I do it will be different. I have a Hills stand on my daughters red Rap & grand daughters red Comet, the Rap can be put on the stand whilst still astride it with Christine on pillion, only going slightly over center, so pegged locked into position as a child could push it off the stand in passing. New design will have hydraulic ram for each leg (possibly a ratchet system as well as), stand deployed using a "D" handle and then operated side ways to ump down the rams keeping the bike up right then rams isolated, this means it can be parked on a sever camber and facing down hill. back onto the bike the stand is released an in the stowed position the spring loaded hydraulic valves are opened automatically and legs retract with ram spring pressure. I'm just thinking of all that unspung weight I can get rid of when I remove my mobile paddock stand that people laugh at but Christine can put the bike, luggage & me onto it so I can then clime off like the old man I am becoming. Nothing is over engineered if it enables one to still ride.
Like Glyn Baxter and his BS trike, I have suggested to him to swap it across to his magnificent "A"Rap (V1001) to be able to enjoy it after spending 18 years doing it up.
 

Marcus Bowden

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I got there eventually but ended up with to photos. The side stand is a proper job but not locking like a Harley Davidson so canot face down hill. must modifie it but tight for space with LH kickstart
 

Clay

Active Website User
VOC Member
Thank you everyone - that's all food for thought. I'm in a quandary now as I can't decide whether to go with Vibrac's toilet cistern float solution or to fabricate a reverse banana homage.:)

On third thoughts I'm going to start with a fresh block of wood and work towards having an extension welded to the bottom.
You did make me realise that I haven't taken any photos of the right side of my bike! Here's a few from before I repainted the tank:
A- Front RHS.jpgA- RHS Engine.jpgA- RHS.jpg
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Toilet cistern! That's a carefully crafted piece of nylon bar :) if it works well I may extend the leg with an insert. On the other hand it's my hooligan bike so I shall probably ride it on a wrinkly ride or two to show the younger guys (65+) on 25 year old electric starts how a 1935 ohc goes.. they think my comet is old huh!
 

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