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Amanda Water Scooter 1958 Vincent Amanda Water Scooter

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
:)Does it have the ex Stevenage new town breeze block ballast ?( The part number of which escapes me at the moment)
 

delagem

Website User
Non-VOC Member
This?

EDIT: on re-reading your question, I'm guessing you mean the flat piece of fiberglass that bolts to the front of the engine, and spans the gaps between these two blocks of styrofoam? Yes, I do have that. No, I don't have a picture of it with me. I am unfortunately 3,000 miles from home, on a ship at sea and don't expect to make port until the end of August. I will take a photo and post it when I return.
 

delagem

Website User
Non-VOC Member
Original seat. I was able to find a shop that had been around since the 1950's; they had the same material, piping, and even the tacks and so were able to replicate this seat. IMG_20111202_132259.jpgIMG_20111202_132351.jpgIMG_20111202_132242.jpgIMG_20111202_132252.jpg
 

delagem

Website User
Non-VOC Member
Steering. This handpole has holes near the top from a prior owner fitting a rototiller style throttle to it. Welded up before re-chrome.IMG_20111202_112237.jpgIMG_20111202_112333.jpgIMG_20111202_112446.jpgIMG_20111201_112130.jpgIMG_20111201_113012.jpgIMG_20111201_112151.jpg
 

delagem

Website User
Non-VOC Member
Floorboard material. I was told by Bob Bonato that this was the same material as used on Model A (?) pickup truck running boards. IMG_20111201_104951.jpgIMG_20111201_105009.jpgIMG_20111202_112620.jpgIMG_20111201_104851.jpgphoto.jpg
 

delagem

Website User
Non-VOC Member
A complete layer of West Systems Epoxy with 6oz Plain Weave on the entire underside of the top deck. A coat of West Systems 105 Epoxy Resin all over the inside and outside, an attempt to rejuvenate the extremely dry fiberglass hull. IMG_20120120_140912.jpg
 
Last edited:

timetraveller

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
For future reference you will get more strength with less weight if you use unwoven bi or tri axial cloth rather than woven. Laid up properly, it absorbs about its own weight of resin rather than about double for the woven and triple for the chopped strand mat. That was a good choice of resin. Ask for the loosely stitched glass if ever you do use the unwoven. It can be moulded into something as small as a teacup.
 

Les

Website User
VOC Member
This?

EDIT: on re-reading your question, I'm guessing you mean the flat piece of fiberglass that bolts to the front of the engine, and spans the gaps between these two blocks of styrofoam? Yes, I do have that. No, I don't have a picture of it with me. I am unfortunately 3,000 miles from home, on a ship at sea and don't expect to make port until the end of August. I will take a photo and post it when I return.
Wish I had seen this before I chose the wrong floorboard grip tape. As for how the floatation blocks are mounted. Yes. Please do post the picture of the flat fiberglass piece bolting to front of engine that I do not have. Thanks....Les.
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Considering the state of fiberglass technology back then and the reported bad workmanship of the sub contract fiberglass people (from wales?) I dont think it looks too bad. I understand the word 'dry' as I guess I was laying up fibreglass housings for generators about 1962 (poor apprentice) and there was lots of talk about heat build up and dont use too much resin and not more than one layer at a time. things, resins and relative costs have improved since then I think
 

timetraveller

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Tim is correct, fibreglass resin chemistry has improved dramatically over the last 60+ years. Some of you will know that I own the Black Knight prototype and used this as my main source of transport for many years, even taking it to South Africa for a year when I worked in Pretoria and also took it on a camping trip to the South of France. There was always a bubble which would form in the heat on top of the front mudguard, approximately where the transfer sits. I tried several time to sort this out and repainted the item and yet, when left in hot sunshine the bubble would always re appear. Many years ago I decided to sort it out once and for all and took all the paint off the mudguard. What a mess. There were multiple layers of paint including one which seemed to be some sort of rubberised underseal, but on top of the guard. When I final got all the paint off you could see the individual strands of glass fibre with large enough voids to see right through the mudguard. It was the roughest piece of fibreglass work I have ever seen. And yet, 65 years after manufacture it is still usable. Good stuff, fibreglass!
 

delagem

Website User
Non-VOC Member
100cc motor. The NGK spark plug cap has got to go. I have a Champion cap somewhere, and a KLG plug for it...IMG_2167.JPG
 

vibrac

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I built a 356 Porsche replica a Chesil speedster in the noughties I am not a great car man but I love the lines of the car and I thought for a change I would build one. I shan't do it again what a pain all those contortions compared to a bike build.(Biggest mistake was building a convertable as when its sunny I ride a bike!) any way point is its nearly twenty years on and the fibre glass body is still absolutely perfect not a blemish yes technology in fibre glass has moved on
1572512689869.jpeg
 

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