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1950 C Rapide kickstarter question

luvolbikes

Website User
Non-VOC Member
Getting my Rapide up and running after several years. After a hard kick years ago the kickstart shaft just spins. Externally visible splines are intact. Plan to remove the cover to inspect the inner workings of the assembly this weekend. What might I likely find?
 

tatty500

Well Known and Active Website User
Non-VOC Member
Getting my Rapide up and running after several years. After a hard kick years ago the kickstart shaft just spins. Externally visible splines are intact. Plan to remove the cover to inspect the inner workings of the assembly this weekend. What might I likely find?


You might just find that the G46 gear is sticky on the G101 bush so that the ratchet does not engage.

Squirt some oil on it.
 

luvolbikes

Website User
Non-VOC Member
Appreciate the help and hope more comments to come. Thanks. This is a beautiful rapide ,Dick Busby rebuild in mid 1990's ,with very low post rebuild miles if anyone is interested it will soon be up for sale in the USA southwest.
 

BigEd

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
VOC Forum Moderator
Thanks for the link BigEd. If not engaging should the G83 spin 360 degrees?
With the kickstart in the up position the G83 rests against the G116 which a flat strip spring that acts a shockabsorber when the return spring G87/1 returns the G83 to the up position after kicking.
when kick starting the G83 engages with the G46 to turn the engine. When the G83 moves fully past and out of engagement with G46 it hits G97 which is spring loaded by spring G92 that acts as a shock absorber. Sometimes the section of the casting can break around this shock absorber if it is not functioning correctly.
G46 gear is held in engagement with G97 by spring G48. As G83 moves back up the ratchet formed by G46/G97 comes out of engagement.
The angle that the G83 can move through is approximately twice the angle of the G83 which is the angle between the stops at each end of the swing. I've not measured the angle but it is probably a little over 90º.
 
Last edited:

luvolbikes

Website User
Non-VOC Member
With the kickstart in the up position the G83 rests against the G116 which a flat strip spring that acts a shockabsorber when the return spring G87/1 returns the G83 to the up position after kicking.
when kick starting the G83 engages with the G46 to turn the engine. When the G83 moves fully past and out of engagement with G46 it hits G97 which is spring loaded by spring G92 that acts as a shock absorber. Sometimes the section of the casting can break around this shock absorber if it is not functioning correctly.
G46 gear is held in engagement with G97 by spring G48. As G83 moves back up the ratchet formed by G46/G97 comes out of engagement.
The angle that the G83 can move through is approximately twice the angle of the G83 which is the angle between the stops at each end of the swing. I've not measured the angle but it is probably a little over 90º.
Good explanation B.E. I am eager to see what I find.
 

ossie

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
I have just put some photos of one that broke on me that I re welded up to use as a spare it looked very brittle I think that's why it broke in that area.
they are in miscalanious as I could not down load to here
OSSIE
 

luvolbikes

Website User
Non-VOC Member
I have just put some photos of one that broke on me that I re welded up to use as a spare it looked very brittle I think that's why it broke in that area.
they are in miscalanious as I could not down load to here
OSSIE
I viewed your welding pictures. Mine fractured into some small parts and about an inch and half upwards. I ordered one from Coventry here in USA. Quite expensive but I guess justified by scarcity of part and limited production issues. A good lesson about using proper kicking technique.
 

luvolbikes

Website User
Non-VOC Member
Well I put the new G82 in and it seems to be behaving properly. Will put my mikunis on for the start up soon. The motor turns freely. Any suggestions before I attempt to start her after 18 idle years? Perhaps a squirt of oil in the plug holes. Dick busby had put some marvel mystery
oil in when rebuilt back then. I'll change the oil before I start her.image:892.jpg
 

Oldhaven

Well Known and Active Website User
VOC Member
Courtesy of Big Sid and thevincent.com. You should peruse the technical topics if you have not already done so.

http://www.thevincent.com/vincent engine.html

Oiling procedure prior to initial starting :
If the oil isn't already poured into the top member oil tank. Proceed thusly. About 2 & 1/2 qts will be enough if you follow these other directions. Then after running it a while, {even a brief ride twice around the block} do then. Fill to the normal level, ie about 3/4 inch below the filler tube. Check for leaks afterwards at Every banjo bolt, etc. Some loss by oozing is common, snug up as needed, but very carefully. Any faulty seal needs being replaced.
There are 4 things to do, important if rapid wear is to be avoided .
#1 Back off about 2 turns the lower banjo bolt at the bottom end of the large feed pipe, a pan beneath it. Wait till oil issues forth freely - not the early bubbles but a clear oil flow. When you see clear oil tighten the banjo bolt carefully { this to let the air column escape ensuring that oil is present at the pump entry port}. Tighten carefully so as not to fracture. Clean off the fittings.
#2 At the forwards end of the timing cover facing you is another banjo bolt - a longer one. Both hex heads are the size of a spark plug hex - 13 /16ths. When unscrewed slide this one out. Using a hand held oil pump can - enter its spout into the hole about 3 or 4 inches, this will project into the oil filter chamber - right into the center of the filter element. Pump this empty chamber full or nearly so to lessen the time needed to circulate the oil when started. Pull out the pump and replace the banjo bolt. Carefully tighten. Wipe away any spilled oil.
#3 In the center of the lower side of the big end feed quill is a small screw, remove and pump in several strokes of oil to flood the rod big ends. Replace the screw.
# 4 Remove the center 2 rocker caps. If they feel to jam Stop. Turn back inward - rotate the motor a bit to lower the rocker arm and try again. Now, refill the squirt can and pump its contents down both pushrod upper openings - 6 full shots in each one. Replace the caps. This will flood the cams and followers so they won't rotate dry, then the oil will run down into the sump where it will be picked up by the pump to be returned to the tank, oiling the rockers as it goes through the return pipe. If all this is done correctly you should see oil returning in the filler neck very soon after restarting. I'd guess within a minute.
#5 Check the gearbox oil level - should show on the bottom of the stick. If not add a bit more til it does. This holds a full quart from drained.
#6 Check the primary case level. Oil should be up to the level plug opening and just ooze out a little bit. Not drip heavily. If so let it drip till it near stops. Replace the short bolt and just snug up, careful not to damage the threads. This is a steel bolt in soft alloy and can strip. Sid 12/14/09
 

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